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City Wide FAQ

Are Licenses Transferable?

No, a business license cannot be transferred from one person to another. When a change of ownership takes place, a new license must be obtained. 

If the business location changes, the business owner must complete the Business Location Change application and comply with the specified requirements. 

Are there any climbing gyms in Provo?

Yes, Provo has one advanced climbing gym and inside of our new recreation center you'll find a beginners bouldering wall.

THE QUARRY | Indoor Climbing Center 
2494 N University PKWY.
Provo, UT 84604
Phone (801) 418-0266

Visit Their Website »

 

Provo City Recreation Center
320 W 500 N
Provo, UT 84601
Phone (801) 852-6600

Visit Their Website »

Are there any climbing shops in Provo?

Yes, Provo city is home to an amazing climbing shop that is sure to be able to fulfill all your climbing needs.

Mountainwork
2494 N University PKWY
Provo, Utah 84604
Phone (801) 371-0223


Are there any exceptions?

A license is not required for a dwelling unit, which is ordinarily owner-occupied but is temporarily rented because:
  • The owner is placed in a hospital, nursing home, assisted living facility or other similar facility
  • The owner has a bona fide, temporary absence of three (3) years or less for activities such as temporary job assignments, sabbaticals, or voluntary service. Indefinite periods of absence from the dwelling do not qualify for this exception. (6.26.020)
  • An accessory apartment in an owner-occupied one family dwelling is not deemed a rental dwelling. 

Can I access emergency service by dialing 311?

No. In the case of a police, fire or medical emergency, you must call 911. In the interest of public safety, if you call 311 with a request for emergency service you will be advised to hang up and call 911.

Can I call 311 from my cell phone?

Yes. If you cannot get through on your cell phone, please call (801) 852-6000 and provide your carrier name to the CSR and we will contact them to establish 311 service to the City.

Can I visit the 311 Call Center to pay my bills?

The Call Center is home to our Customer Service Representatives who operate our citizen inquiry 311 service phone lines as well as welcome public traffic to our lobby for same services.

Define Sale of Goods or Services?

Means the conduct and agreement of a solicitor and a competent individual in a residence regarding a particular good(s) or service(s) that entitles the consumer to rescind the same within three (3) days under any applicable federal, state, or local law. Chapter 6.09.030(29)

Define Services.

Means those intangible goods or personal benefits offered, provided, or sold to a competent individual of a residence. Chapter 6.09.030(30)

Do I have to give my name when I call 311?

Only information required to successfully complete the request will be asked for during the call.

Do I Need A Business License?

Whether you are operating in a commercial location or from a home, if you are doing any of the following you need a business license:

  • Keeping, conducting, or maintaining a rental dwelling, a mobile home rental dwelling, or a mobile home park
  • Distributing tangible personal property at a retail or wholesale
  • Distributing goods, or providing services to others for payment or reward, including: retail merchants, some day care providers, restaurants and food trucks, persons engaged in trades and crafts, professionals, including doctors, lawyers, accountants and dentists, contractors, banks, savings and loan associations, and real estate agents.

Employees working for an employer are usually not required to obtain their own business license. State licensed contractors only need to be licensed in the city where they have an office, including a home based office. 

Do I need to license my bike?

Anyone who rides there bike in the city of Provo needs to register their bicycle. Residents and non-residents alike, the only requirement is the bike will be used inside of Provo City Limits.

Does every service request have a tracking number?

Yes. When you request a service, the Customer Service Representative will provide you with the unique reference number.

Does my event require a Special Events Permit?

  • An event of any size on city property. This would include: parks, parking lots, streets and sidewalks.
  • An event with over 300 in attendance on private property.
If your event falls into either of these categories, you may need a Special Events Permit.
Read through the Special Events Permit Application Policies and Instructions to find out more.

If your event will be held in a park, please read through the Special Park Use Guidelines before filling out your application.

If your event will require a level of Public Safety Support (police/fire), please check the Calendar of Approved Events to see if an event has been approved for the day you are requesting. Only one event will be approved per day that requires Public Safety Support.

Note: There is no guarantee that your event will be approved. It is important you are aware that any fees paid at the time of application will not be refunded due to the cost associated with the necessary approval process.

How Can I Speed Up the Process?

The best ways to make sure the process flows as smoothly and quickly as possible are:

  • Check Before You Apply and Business License Requirements and become familiar with all steps necessary for your type of business before you fill out an application
  • Fill out the application accurately, completely, and as clearly as possible, providing a very detailed description of type of business
  • Work with departments to fulfill requirements and schedule inspections
  • If your business requires a Health Department inspection, begin the process about a week before beginning the license process with Provo. 

How do I appeal a ticket?

If you disagree with the notice of parking violation you received, you may fill out an appeal online or appear in person to speak with a Traffic Clerk. Please be aware of the following appeal policies and procedures:

1. If the appeal is submitted within five (5) business days no late fees will be assessed during the appeal process.

2. A Traffic Clerk will review the appeal along with comments provided by the officer and photo evidence associated with the violation before making a decision.

3. A Traffic Clerk will inform you of the decision to uphold, dismiss, or reduce the parking violation (through email unless an email address is not provided). If you do not receive the decision within seven (7) business days, you need to call Customer Service at 801 852 6000 to verify the appeal was received and is being processed. DO NOT ASSUME YOUR CITATION HAS BEEN DISMISSED.

4. If the appeal is denied (upheld ticket) the civil penalty is to be paid within seven (7) days of a Traffic Clerk's decision to avoid late fees. You can pay online, by mail or in person at Provo City Customer Service.

How do I connect with the Call Center?

You can access our citizen inquiry service in any of the following ways:
Phone

311 or (801) 852-6000

Fax (801) 852-6966

Email 311@provo.org

Main Office  351 W Center Street
Mailing Address 351 W Center Street, Provo, Utah 84601

How do I find Rock Canyon?

Rock Canyon is quite a long way south of Salt Lake City and is in the east side of Provo.

From the north (Salt Lake City) drive south on I-15 and exit at 800 N in Orem (exit 272). Drive east until 800 N ends; take the exit right onto University Avenue. Continue south on University Avenue until 2230 N (the 7th light signal). Turn left and drive east through a residential neighborhood until the road starts to curve right (south). Turn left on N. Temple Drive (the Mormon Temple is visible just before you turn). Continue east on N. Temple through a 4-way stop sign. As the road curves to the south (right) the Rock Canyon parking will be directly ahead.

From the south exit from I-15 at University Avenue in Provo (exit 263). Continue north on University Avenue until 2230 N (the first light signal after passing BYU's football stadium on your right). Turn right and follow the rest of the directions, above.

How Do I Get a Business License?

We want your experience with Business Licensing to be as smooth as possible.  Please check Before You Apply and Business License Requirements for additional steps, not listed below, you may need to take before turning in your application. When you're ready to turn in your application, please bring documentation of all steps completed with the state and/or county as well as a valid government issued ID, and fee payment, to the Business Licensing Department. Please note that you will be assessed a non-refundable licensing fee at the time of application. The Business Licensing Department is located at Customer Service at the City Center Building (North Entrance). Customer Service office hours are M-F 8 AM-6 PM. To contact Customer Service call 311 if you are within Provo city limits, or (801) 852-6000 if you are not. 

To apply for a business license you will need to fill out a business license application. You can pick up and turn in, a paper application for a business license in person at customer service or business licensing.  Information packets related to licensing requirements are also available for pick up along with an application. You can also fill out a business license application online here.  Please be sure to include a valid e-mail address on your application, and review your completed application for accuracy. After filling out your application online, print the competed application and bring it to the Business Licensing Department along with your ID, fee payment, and any other required documentation.

Does your business handle alcohol? Check our Beer License page for information related to obtaining a beer license. You can find a beer license application hereThe license may be filled out online, printed, and turned in with all other applications and paperwork. 

The following businesses have additional requirements. If your business is related to these categories, please read the code pertaining to your business. 

If you have questions related to the licensing process please contact Jessy Antonino at  Licensing@provo.org or by phone at (801) 852-7834

How do I get an exemption to the noise ordinance?

The city has a well established noise policy found in chapter 9.06 of our code book. The amount of noise that is acceptable is determined by the decibels produced. The ordinance does allow for exceptions for sounds created by parades, carnivals, special public social events, or special construction projects.

An exemption is granted by a permit from the Mayor. If you are interested in an exemption, please contact Tracy Orme in the Mayor's office at 801-852-6105 or torme@provo.org.

Each exemption is issued under the condition that it can be revoked. It is expected that during the event the applicant will work with police if complaints are filed to accommodate the reasonable needs of neighbors.

How do I grant someone “Power of Attorney”?

A “Power of Attorney” form can be found on the City’s website. Please read the disclaimer appearing at the top of the form.

How do I license my rental property with Provo City?

A license is issued after the following steps have been completed
  • A complete application has been submitted.
  • Provo City has received payment for the license.
  • The zoning division has reviewed the application.
  • The property has complied with all requirements for a license.

How long is the license valid?

All licenses expire July 31st of each year.

How much does a license cost?

The license fee for one (1) dwelling unit, such as a single condominium or a single family dwelling, is $20.00.
The license fee for more than one (1) dwelling unit is $60.00. A duplex is considered two (2) dwelling units.

How Much Does It Cost?

To find fees associated with your business, including inspection fees (you may have more than one fee), see "business licensing" on the Provo Consolidated Fee Schedule.

 

How much is a bicycle license?

The cost for a bicycle license is $1 per bike.

How much training do the Customer Service Representatives receive?

Our CSRs receive a minimum of three weeks of full-time training before taking calls from the public. The training ranges from briefings on all city services through extensive hands-on training on the Call Center interactive systems and utility billing. Regular quality assurance reviews are held to ensure our CSRs are providing quality service.

I have several rental properties in Provo City; do I need a license for each location?

One license will be issued to each entity, regardless of the number of units owned by that entity.  If a person owns multiple properties which are deeded in separate owner names, LLC’s, or Corporations, each will need to apply for a separate rental license.  (Ex. Joe Smith; Joe & Jane Smith; Smith LLC will each require a separate license.)
 
If you own rental dwellings in multiple locations, please complete a Property Information Form (this form is part of the application) for each location. If multiple buildings are part of a complex, one Property Information form should be completed for each complex. The zoning review requires information for each building in the complex.

If 911 is busy can I call 311?

No. In the case of a police, fire or medical emergency, you must call 911.

If I have submitted a completed application, made payment, but I haven’t received my license because zoning has not reviewed my application, will I be cited for renting properties without a license?

It may take a few weeks for the zoning division to review your application. Once you have submitted the application and paid the licensing fee, you may request a receipt for confirmation that Provo City has received your application. If violations are found as part of the review process, citations may be issued for those violations if they are not corrected in a timely manner.

If I request a service outside the department’s regular business hours, does that mean all city offices are available to respond to the request immediately?

Our Call Center is here to provide the ability to request information or services from the City at your convenience. Should you place your inquiry to the Call Center outside the Departments normal business hours, our CSR’s will ensure that your request for service is sent to the appropriate department for follow-up during the next business day.

Is my license transferable?

Licenses are not transferable. Written notice must be given to the business license official within thirty (30) days after transferring ownership of the property.

Is my personal information secure?

Yes, your information is protected by the same level of security as all information used by the City of Provo.

Should I report police non-emergencies to 311?

You should continue to report any police non-emergencies to (801) 852-6210, e.g. minor fender benders, etc.

Soliciting or Solicit or Solicitation?

means any of the following activities
  • seeking to obtain sales or orders for the exchange of goods, wares, merchandise, or perishables of any kind, for any kind of remuneration or consideration, regardless of whether advance payment is sought;
  • seeking to obtain prospective customers to apply for or to purchase insurance, subscriptions to publications, or publications;
  • seeking to obtain contributions of money or any other thing of value for the benefit of any person or entity;
  • seeking to obtain orders or prospective customers for goods or services;
  • seeking to engage an individual in conversation at a residence for the purpose of promoting or facilitating the receipt of information regarding religious belief, political position, charitable conduct, or a home solicitation sale; 
  • other activities falling within the commonly accepted definition of soliciting, such as hawking or peddling.
Chapter 6.09.030(31)

What are Home Solicitation Sales?

It means to make or attempt to make a sale of goods or services by a solicitor at a residence by means of door-to-door solicitation, regardless of the:

  • means of payment or consideration used for the purchase;
  • time of delivery of the goods or services; or
  • previous or present classification of the solicitor as a solicitor, peddler, hawker, itinerant merchant or similar designation. Chaper 6.09.030 (20)

 

What Happens After I Turn in the application?

After we receive your application it will be reviewed for completion and accuracy. Next, we determine if any additional licenses and/or inspections are required. Your application will then either be approved, or sent to the right departments for additional review. You will be contacted if an inspection needs to be scheduled or if more information is needed. 

What happens if my property does not meet the minimum health/safety and zoning requirements?

If the property does not comply with health/safety codes and zoning codes, you will be given a list of corrections that you can do to bring your property into compliance. Conditions on the property which would pose imminent danger to the health and safety of tenants must be corrected before you will be issued a license.

What happens when I call 311?

  • Upon receipt of your call our Customer Service Representatives will:
  • search our knowledge base for the answer to your question
  • if you are calling to request a service, the CSR will open a new case for your request and will provide you with these two things:
    • the approximate length of time to complete your request 
    • a unique reference number for that request. It is important that you keep this number handy for future inquires due to privacy legislation; if you lose the number or don’t record it, we will not be able to provide you with any updates on your service request.
  • should you require additional expertise from departmental staff our Customer Service Representatives will be pleased to connect you with the right individual during normal business hours or to assist you in leaving a message in the right location should you wish to do so.

What if I don't have my ticket or citation number?

If you have lost or misplaced your ticket our agents will assist you over the phone or in person. Please call Provo311 Customer Service at 801 852 6000, or 311 (inside city limits), or in person at 351 W Center Street. Please have your License Plate number available.

What if I want to speak directly to an individual in a department?

The implementation of the 311 consolidated Call Center is intended to enhance the quality of service provide by the City of Provo. In the majority of cases, our highly trained CSRs will be able to provide the answer to your question(s), however, should you require additional service/information, our CSRs will be happy to generate a request for the department to contact you directly.

Should you require a highly specialized service, our CSRs will be pleased to connect you with the right individual during normal business hours, or, assist you in leaving a message in the right location, should you wish to do so.

What if my Business Closes or Moves out of Provo?

If your business status changes, please notify the business license department using one of the following methods:

  • Email: Send the business name, license number, address, and date of closure to licensing@provo.org
  • In person: Pick up a business license renewal form from Customer Service or the Business License Department (located in Customer Service). Complete the "Status Change" section and return it to the Business License department between M-F 8 AM-5 PM

Business Licensing/Customer Service 

City Center Building (North Entrance)

351 W Center ST

Provo, Utah 84601

  • Mail: Send a letter which includes the business name, license number, address and date of closure to:

Provo City Corp

Attn: Business Licensing

351 W Center ST

Provo, UT 84601

What is 311?

311 is an easy-to-remember telephone number to request information or services from the City of Provo. Just one call will connect you with highly-trained Customer Service Representatives (CSRs) ready to provide answers to your questions or assistance in requesting a service from the City.

 

What is a rental dwelling?

Any building or portion of a building used or designated for use as a residence by one (1) or more persons and is available to be rented, loaned, leased or hired out for a period of one (1) month or longer. A unit that is not owner occupied is considered a rental even if no rental fee is charged or collected.

What is a short-term rental dwelling?

Short-term rental dwelling means a building or portion of a building, or a manufactured home used or designated or designed for use as a residence by one (1) or more persons and is:  (a) available to be rented, loaned, leased or hired out for a period of less than one (1) month; or (b) arranged, designed, or built to be rented, loaned, leased or hired out for a period of less than one (1) month.

What is an entity?

An entity can take the following forms: Corporation, General Partnership, Limited Partnership, Limited Liability Partnership, and Limited Liability Company or Sole Proprietorship. If you are operating as a sole proprietor using your own name, you do not need to register with the Utah State Division of Commerce. All other entity types, including "Doing Business As (DBA)," must be currently registered with the Utah State Division of Commerce before completing the licensing application.

What is Door-to-Door Solicitation?

It means the practice of engaging in or attempting to engage in conversation with any person at a residence, whether or not that person is a competent individual, while making or seeking to make or facilitate a home solicitation sale, or attempting to further the sale of goods and or services.

Chapter 6.09.030(15)

What is the Penalty Schedule?

Penalty Schedule

Ordinance   Description Within 5 days  within 6-11 days  After 11 days 
41-1a-414  Disability Space Violation $125 $250 $375
41-61-1402  Parked Facing Traffic/More than 12" from Curb $30 $60  $90 
9.31.010(1)  Parked on Sidewalk $30 $60 $90
9.31.010(4)   15' of Fire Hydrant $30 $60  $90 
9.31.020(1)
 Failure to Obey Painted Lines, Curbs or Signs $30 $60  $90 
9.31.020(2)  Parallel Parking  $30  $60  $90 
9.31.070(2a)  Red Curb
$30  $60  $90 
9.31.100  Registration/Plate Violation  $30  $60  $90 
9.32.120  Fire Lane Violation  $30  $60  $90 
9.31.010(2)  Blocking a Driveway  $25  $50  $75 
9.31.050(1f)  Unattended Vehicle for 72 hours  $25  $50  $75 
9.31.090  Snow Emergency Route Violation $25  $50  $75 
9.31.010(5)  On or Over a Crosswalk  $25  $50  $75 
9.31.010(6)  20' of a Crosswalk or Intersection  $25  $50  $75 
14.37.080  Parking in Yard  $25  $50  $75 
9.19.030  Parking During Park Curfew Hours  $25  $50  $75 
9.31.010  Not in Properly Marked Parking Space  $25  $50  $75 

 

When Does my License Expire? How do I Renew?

See statement on Business licensing on Home page.

When is the 311 Call Center open?

The 311 Call Center is open 11 hours a day, 5 days a week, 7:00AM – 6:00PM (excluding State and/or Federal holidays).

When should I call 311?

  • Request for service (sewer back-up, water main break, garbage collections, street light out, etc.)
  • Request for information (permit processing, animal control, building inspection, traffic/parking issues, hours of operation, etc.)
  • Concern (parking ticket, property conditions, road/street maintenance, snow clearing, noise, etc.)

Where Can I get a List of Existing Businesses in Provo?

You can find a list of some businesses in Provo in the Business Directory. After your business license is approved and you're ready for business, you can add your business to the list. 

Where do I get a bicycle License

Bicycle licenses are available at the Provo City Center Building located at 351 W Center ST. You can fill out the application beforehand by downloading it here.

Bicycle License Form »

Where Do I Start?

Where do I submit my application?

Pick up an application at Provo311. Once application is complete it can be submitted at to Provo311.

 

Provo311 is located at:
351 West Center Street, Provo

Who can call 311?

Any residents, businesses or tourists wishing to get information or request services from the City of Provo. 

Who do I call if I have a complaint about the service I receive?

Our CSRs are trained to provide excellent quality service to our customers. However, in the unfortunate circumstance that our CSRs were not able to provide the appropriate service you may ask to speak to the Supervisor on duty. Written complaints can be directed to the Call Center at 351 W Center Street, Provo, Utah 84601.

Who do I contact to answer my questions about rental dwelling licensing?

For questions regarding zoning and Health/Safety code issues, please call (801) 852-6400.

For information regarding the licensing process and fees, please call (801) 852-6532 or send an email to licensing@provo.org

Who needs to license rental properties with Provo City?

Each entity, person or business, which owns, operates or maintains a rental dwelling within Provo City, must have a rental dwelling business license.

Why 311?

With over 500 different telephone numbers listed to access city services, many people did not know what number to dial to reach the appropriate department. Now you can connect to city services with only an abbreviated dialing number.

Why Should I Get a License?

Most importantly, you should obtain a business license before conducting any business in Provo because a valid license is required by local and state law. States and municipalities require businesses to be licensed in order to protect the consumer, the community, and the business owner. The licensing process aims to help the business owner comply with local and state regulations, and to make sure the business is operating safely. For example, the fire department ensures safe conditions such as having enough emergency exits and fire extinguishers, and public works will inspect businesses to make sure contaminants aren't released into our public water. 

Will I be required to get an inspection for each unit?

An inspection of the property may be required prior to the issuance of a rental license. Information provided on the application will be compared to original approval documents in the zoning office to determine the legal use and occupancy for the rental. Properties that were originally constructed as single family homes and have been converted into two or more units may be inspected.

Will I get a call back the next day to confirm the department has received my request?

One call is all you need to request a service. When you call with your request for service, you will be provided with:
  • a unique reference number related to that particular request;
  • an email will be sent to you that will include the reference number provided to you by phone.

Will I Need a Background Check?

A background check must be performed by the Provo Police Department as part of the business license process if your business requires a beer license. A background check waiver is included in the application packet you receive through business licensing. This form authorizes the Provo Police Department to conduct a background check for you. Turn this form in along with all other applicable forms included with your application, to the Business Licensing Department. 

A background check is also required for the following types of businesses:

  • Towing
  • Locksmith
  • Taxi
  • Door to Door Solicitor
  • Sexually Oriented Businesses and Their Employees

However, these background checks are done through the Utah Department of Public Safety (UDPS), or, you can request one from the Police Records Department by calling (801) 852-6231. A letter from the UDPS or Provo Police Records certifying the background check results must be provided with the completed application as proof of clearance. Expect this process to take 1-2 weeks if you send your request by mail, and about 20 minutes if you apply in person at the UDPS Taylorsville location. The cost through UDPS is $15, or $10 if through Provo Police.

Will I Need an Inspection?

Health Department: Contact the Utah County Health Department if your business:

  • Sells, handles, or prepares food, including: restaurants, gas stations, concession stands, snow cones, food trucks, etc. 
  • Produces body art (permanent make up and tattoos)
  • Has a tanning bed
  • Has any size or type of pool
  • Is a daycare or school which prepares or serves food
  • Handles alcohol

Obtaining a permit or license from the health department generally takes two weeks. Consider beginning this process well before contacting Provo for a business license. A business license cannot be given until a required health permit is obtained. A lot of information related to necessary health permits and inspections can be found on the Utah County Health Department's Environmental Health website. Some information related to fees can be found here

Fire: The fire department will schedule an inspection for all restaurants, and other businesses if a review of the application indicates possible public safety or fire hazards. 

Public Works: A public works inspection will be scheduled for any business with possible risks associated with the water systems. 

Department of Agriculture: The Utah Department of Agriculture requires an inspection of any home based food production business (cottage food production) as well as animal, farming, and beekeeping businesses. 

 

 

Will I receive a renewal notice?

Renewal notices will be mailed prior to August 1st . A late fee will be assessed on payments received after August 31st.

Will my call be recorded?

Yes, all calls received by the 311 Call Center are recorded for quality assurance and training purposes.

Will my personal information be shared?

The 311 Call Center operation is governed by The Freedom of Information and Personal Privacy Act. Only information required to successfully complete the request will be asked for during the call.

Does the ombudsman give legal advice?

The ombudsman does not provide legal advice or services.

Is there a fee for ombudsman services?

No, this service is provided at no cost to the residents of Provo or other citizens who are concerned with issues in Provo.

What are some common types of complaints for the ombudsman?

General nuisance complaints are commonly reported to the ombudsman including weeds, junk, abandoned vehicles, potholes, animals at large, street lighting, damaged sidewalks, odor problems, and many others. 

What does the ombudsman do?

The ombudsman receives complaints or concerns from individuals or groups either by phone, by mail or in person.  The ombudsman will then investigate the details of the complaint and possibly refer the complaint to the appropriate City department for resolution.  All complaints may not be resolved due to economic constraints or other possible mitigating circumstances.

What is an Ombudsman

An ombudsman is a liaison or mediator between citizens and government agencies.  The ombudsman is a neutral party that will aid citizens of Provo in resolving conflicts and seeking solutions to issues by fact-finding, investigating, and problem solving.  The ombudsman is your advocate in dealing with City government.

What kinds of complaints can the ombudsman work to resolve?

The ombudsman will receive complaints related to any City Department.  City Departments include: Administration, Administrative Services (Finance, Human Resources, Information Services, Justice Court), Community Development (Building Inspection,  Planning  & Zoning),  Economic Development, Energy, Engineering, Fire, Legal, Parks, Police, Public Works, Redevelopment, Sanitation, Streets, Storm Water, and Water Resources.

Will the ombudsman help with landlord - tenant disputes?

The Provo City ombudsman is a resource for concerns dealing with Provo City government.  Civil or private contracts or agreements are not within the jurisdiction of Provo City government, and as such, must be resolved by civil means.

Can I watch a program on demand?

Yes, located the appropriate tab on the home page (CityBeat, Provo Schools, UV Chamber, etc) and then search for the program by title or date.

How can I get Channel 17 to film my event?

Fill out a Media Request Form on the website with as much detail as possible and the programming committee will contact you.

How Can I Watch Channel 17?

Cable Channel 17 within Provo City Limits, or online at provo.org/Channel17.

Are there going to be some sort of renderings or specific layouts shared with the public?

  • The architectural consultant has shared several concepts (found farther down this page), but they are simply suggestions or ideas at this stage in the process. Once Provo residents vote on the bond, the outcome will determine next steps, including determining the exact location, architectural styles, layout, and other design and engineering work related to construction.

At what rate will the bonds be sold?

  • That will be established at the time of sale. The bond counselor was not allowed to speculate on that price.

How can I get updates from my neighborhood and/or City Council representative?

Provo City has 34 official neighborhoods and each has a Neighborhood Chair. Each neighborhood has its own way of handling communication with its residents. Some meet regularly while others meet only as needed. To receive updates on when meetings are scheduled or to receive updates on current issues from your City Council representative, use the online signup form and choose which types of email you'd like to receive.

How did you establish the median Provo residential property value?

How did you estimate the cost for construction without having a final building design?

  • To estimate the costs of construction without a final building design the City engaged an architectural firm, Architectural Nexus, to provide the space needs analysis, initial mass blocking of space, and to outline overall structural and siting considerations. Once these were determined, Construction Control a construction estimating firm, to provided estimated construction costs, which included allowances anticipated in labor and materials, and on top of these estimates we included allowances as follows: contingencies 10%, construction inflation (for materials and labor) 6%, anticipated bonding costs 1% of the bond, and costs such as design fees 6%, permits and testing 2%. The City felt it prudent that we go this route rather than spend the full cost of architectural design before asking voters to approve the bond needed to fund the project.

How do I find out what happened in City Council meetings if I'm not able to attend in person?

City Council Meetings and Work Sessions are broadcast live and are available as recordings on demand after the meeting. The Council's YouTube channel hosts the live broadcasts. Recordings of meetings can be found listed by the type of meeting. The Council office regularly publishes newsletters that highlight issues from recent meetings. 

How do I get an exemption to the noise ordinance?

The city has a well established noise policy found in chapter 9.06 of our code book. The amount of noise that is acceptable is determined by the decibels produced. The ordinance does allow for exceptions for sounds created by parades, carnivals, special public social events, or special construction projects.

An exemption is granted by a permit from the Mayor. If you are interested in an exemption, please contact Tracy Orme in the Mayor's office at 801-852-6105 or torme@provo.org.

Each exemption is issued under the condition that it can be revoked. It is expected that during the event the applicant will work with police if complaints are filed to accommodate the reasonable needs of neighbors.

How do I get my issue before the Council?

To have your issue brought before the Council, you will need to review your issue and submit it to a Council Member who will then sponsor it in a discussion before the body of the Council. You can find the contact information for Council Members on our Meet the Council page.

How do I sign up for the Council Newsletter?

The Provo City Council office produces a regular newsletter dealing with policy, issues, and discussions about the future of the city. They also produce a monthly neighborhood-focused newsletter.

To join the email list for the newsletters, email updates from Council members, or updates from your neighborhood representative, go to the online signup form and choose the options that interest you.

How long was the City Center originally intended to last?

How much debt does the City have?

  • Figures current as of July 25, 2018
  • General Obligation Bonds (paid with revenues from property taxes)
    • Recreation Center Bond $30,010,000    ends 2032
  • Revenue Bonds (paid with specific revenues - listed with each)
    • Telecom Bonds (utility fee) $20,435,000   ends 2026
    • Airport Bonds (tax increment) $4,975,000   ends 2034
    • Cemetery Bond (cemetery operations) $1,993,000   ends 2034
    • Stormwater Bonds (stormwater utility fees) $3,950,000   ends 2024
    • Water Revenue Bonds (water utility fees) $9,645,000   ends 2035
    • Wastewater Revenue Bonds (wastewater utility fees)  $8,040,000   ends 2035
    • Provo Power (electric utility fees) $17,220,000 ends 2035
  • Total outstanding principal balance (does not include bond premium, discount or other amortizable costs) = $96,268,000

How much money has Provo City put away toward the building of new facilities?

  • The state legislature limits how much cities can hold in reserve for the general fund, which is where the money for a city hall/police facility has to come from. The idea is to keep taxes the city can use for operations low. When a city needs a major capital outlay like a new building, the bonding process requires us to go to the voters rather than just take money from a savings account. It increases transparency and accountability. Cities and school districts often favor bonding because the residents who use the services offered in the new buildings will pay for it. For example, if the City were to save money for a project 15 years in advance, taxpayers in the present may never see the benefit from the saved taxes, especially if a taxpayer were to move away before the project was complete. Taxpayers would also be paying higher taxes than necessary in the present. Equity is a key value in the public sector – those who benefit from city services should pay for them.

How much space do you really need?

  • Today, the total size of the current City Center has 80,907 sq. feet. Police utilize 21,720 sq. feet and Fire utilizes 7,670 sq. feet. All other City departments use the remaining 51,517 sq. feet. In 2012, McClaren, Wilson and Lawrie, Inc. (MWL) conducted a “Police Space Needs Analysis,” which called for 78,000 sq. feet for the police and fire headquarters. Since then, the department’s workforce has increased. A 2013 study by Architectural Nexus called for 80,400 sq. feet for other city functions by 2040.
  • The current assessment (gross square footage) used for this proposal:
    • Public Safety          90,515 (8,700 shelled space)
    • Other city facilities  75,350 (8,700 shelled space)

How will parking needs be addressed?

  • The final site plan hasn’t been chosen, so many options are still open. One is to build facilities higher (taller buildings) in order to leave more room for parking. Another is to allow development of the space not used by City facilities and require that a parking structure be included in the development.

How will residents benefit from the new City Center?

  • The new City Center will be the new home for the City’s police and fire operations, including emergency dispatch, as well as the City’s administrative departments. The new City Center will be a facility designed for all these uses, which have expanded considerably to serve Provo’s growing population since the 1970s when the current City Center was constructed. On a routine basis, residents may find themselves at the City Center to pay a utility bill, renew a passport, register a rental dwelling, get a parking permit, get a special events permit, or any other number of City services. If a resident calls to report a missing trash can, stolen bicycle, ask questions about fireworks, or get a pet license, all of those services are routed through the City Center. The 911 Emergency Dispatch center is also part of the new City Center. The current facilities are not built to the current seismic standards, and these seismic upgrades in the new facility are critical should Provo face a major emergency or natural disaster. First responders must have safe facilities to operate from, but the departments that support the Police and Fire departments, such as finance, information systems, and other administrative functions are critical as well in the aftermath of a disaster or large-scale emergency.

Is the 2013 assessment the first one examining options/building safety?

  • No, this assessment was not the first of its kind. There have been a series of studies examining space needs and seismic considerations:
    • In 1992, an engineering consultant completed a “Seismic Vulnerability and Watertightness Assessment” (see page 14 of this document). Since the 1990s, there have been further developments in seismic standards.
    • In 2012, a Police Department space needs analysis was conducted by McClaren, Wilson and Lawrie, Inc. (MWL) , which examined spatial and functional needs of the department.
    • In 2013, Architectural Nexus produced the Provo City Center Space Needs & Programming Study, which focused on space needs and programming of physical space: “Whereas the previous studies looked at the specific seismic capacity of the structure, and the specific needs of one critical department housed within the structure, this document was to take a broader overview, addressing other key building components (mechanical systems, electrical, roofing, etc.) and the needs of all other city departments housed within the structure.”
    • In 2016, an engineering consultant conducted a Provo City Center Minor Structural Condition Assessment, which focused on several aging components of the City Center and included a review of the 1992 seismic assessment.

Is there no other alternative for Provo residents to pay for this other than property tax? Instead of just property owners, can’t sales tax be used?

  • There could be other options such as an additional sales tax levy (which would also need to go to the voters). However, the usual way to fund general fund buildings such as these is through a property tax levy, a method preferred by bond markets. Due to the scale of this kind of capital expenditure, a bond is the route that best fits the circumstances.

Isn’t $69 million overpriced for a city hall?

  • This amount includes approximately $4.5 million for replacing Fire Station 2 on Canyon Road. The remaining $64.5 million will go toward building a new city hall, emergency dispatch center, and fire and police headquarters. Of the $69 million for the project, approximately $41 million would be used for police, fire and emergency dispatch facilities and approximately $28 million for other city services.
  • The figure includes non-construction items such as 10% contingency, construction inflation at 4.5% per year (with the assumption of starting construction Fall 2019), and bonding costs at 1%. It also includes allowances for demolition, site development, surface parking, secure parking, utilities, IT relocation, fixtures, furnishings, and equipment (FFE), moving costs, and (if necessary) funds to purchase the tire store (located at 500 West Center St).
  • Another factor included in the cost is that public safety buildings must be built to much higher standards today than in the past to help them survive natural disasters.
  • As Wayne Parker, Provo's Chief Administrative Officer, has indicated previously, the numbers have been worked, reworked, reviewed, and reviewed again -  internally and externally. The City believes the space programmed and costs for that space are reasonable, necessary, and not excessive.
  • By comparison, the new Provo High School cost $79 million to build. The new Fourth District Courthouse is estimated to cost $86 million.

Was the decision on the bond rushed? Can’t you wait until next year to place this on the ballot?

  • The City’s research and decision-making process has been in progress for several years; Wayne Parker, CAO, presented to the Council at their July 10, 2018 Work Meeting and outlined this process which started in 2013 (click the hyperlink to view his presentation). The previous question outlines steps taken over the last five years in reaching this decision point and some of the reasons that this decision has come to the forefront right now.
  • During their review of the city budget for fiscal year 2018, the Council discussed a possible property tax increase to address inflation, but ultimately did not begin the public hearing process to go through with that increase. The last property tax increase of this kind occurred in 2015; before that, an inflation increase had not been passed since 1991. The Council considers many factors as they approach property tax increases (such as timing of municipal elections and timing of school district property tax increases or bonding), and ultimately the Council felt that this time was the right time to pursue a bond to meet this critical need--with the possibility of a school district bond in the next few years and with interest rates and construction costs on the rise, the City desired to secure favorable terms for a bond and for the construction of a new facility.

What about the need for a new wastewater treatment plant?

  • The City is still studying the wastewater issues and how to implement a phased approach as has been discussed in Council meetings. Whether done as a pay-as-you-go project, a revenue bond, or by borrowing from the state, City leaders have expressed a desire to do it with the least burdensome impact on ratepayers. A phased approach will accomplish that regardless of the method used for funding. The wastewater treatment project would be funded by revenues from customers. Regardless of the option to pay for the treatment plant, we anticipate sizable increases in the wastewater utility rates.

What about the school bonds?

  • The Provo City School District’s facilities committee has begun work to evaluate when and how to bond again, but a firm recommendation has not been made, nor has the School Board taken any action at this point. The dollar amount currently being shared around the community is based on a report from that committee and is subject to change before any decision is made.  Although the School District is a separate entity from Provo City, both have an impact on taxpayers.

What do people mean when they call it a “legacy building?”

  • During the discussions of various options, the term “legacy” was mentioned as some looked at pros and cons. Individuals may have had different definitions in mind when using that term, but staff understood it to mean that some residents were interested in the new city center being well-built and standing as a welcoming element as people entered the downtown area.

What happens when a zoning violation is reported to the City?

  • First, a zoning officer determines if a zoning violation exists.
  • If the zoning officer determines the property is not in compliance with City zoning ordinances, a notice of violation is sent to the property owner.  The notice includes a time frame to bring the property into compliance.
  • If the time frame elapses without compliance, the case is referred to the City’s Legal Department. 
  • The Legal Department issues a letter informing the property owner that the City intends to file criminal charges.
  • Most cases are resolved without the need to file a criminal action with the courts. 

What other options and locations were considered?

  • The City has explored a number of options in order to find one that best meets the needs of the City. Other options and locations which were considered are described below:
    • Early on, the City considered properties in the Riverwoods business park that formerly comprised the Ancestry offices. This site would have required extensive renovation.
    • In the 2013 Provo City Center Space Needs & Programming Study, the architectural consultant examined the current City Center block, as well as two other contiguous downtown properties (see page 10 of the study), north and south of the current City Center block.
    • The timeline for addressing a replacement facility was moved up when an opportunity arose with the Provo Towne Centre Sears box building as an option for a City Center.
    • The City also considered the possibilities of repurposing other government facilities, such as the Historic County Courthouse and State Court building. Ultimately, those options did not present enough space, possibility for expansion, or were destined for other uses.
    • During the most recent process of public hearings and consideration of three options, the Council had narrowed the options to the Provo Towne Centre mall and the current downtown City Center block.
    • The Council was also educated about the costs associated with ‘doing nothing.’ While not a formal option for consideration, City officials recognized that a bond election can have one of two outcomes, and that the Council and residents needed to understand the implications that should a bond fail, there were still significant maintenance upgrades that would be required to keep the current City Center facility operable.
    • As for the options presented, we looked around Provo for possible locations and existing buildings. When the mall became an option, Brixton put a lot of effort into creating concepts that would appeal. We did not spend considerable sums creating concepts for Options 2 and 3, rather we relied on concepts proposed a few years ago to inform our thinking about what is possible on the current City Center blocks. While we will work on refining concepts for the current location on Center Street should the bond pass, we are anticipating an RFP process that would bring proposals for the City to consider. Among the considerations to weigh will be price, value to the City, curb appeal, expected redevelopment plans for the remaining block, and the City would be remiss if it didn't entertain the possibility of a land swap if a proposed city complex and redevelopment were to be fairly attractive.
    • Wayne Parker, CAO, addressed a similar question during a Council work meeting in August 2018, sharing details about several of these locations.
  • Why did you choose this option? (the most expensive one)
    • While the option chosen had the highest cost of the three presented to Council, it was not the most expensive option considered. Other options were researched earlier in the process and were ultimately rejected due to their high cost. The final three options were presented to the City Council for consideration and Council members turned to the public for input before making their decision. Tours of the current facility were taken in order to see the problems first-hand. Council members also asked for input from the Police Chief and Fire Chief before making their final selection of which option to move forward with. The new City Center option also allows for the City to prepare for future growth by building space that can be utilized for needed expansion 10, 25, and 50 years down the road. It also allows for the City to build facilities that best suit needs of the departments and maximize space.

What type of bonds are these?

  • These will be general obligation bonds secured by property tax revenues.

What will this bond cost a Provo resident over the next 20 years?

  • Visit the Utah County Land Use Records website to look up the current value of your property as set by the Utah County Assessor. The Utah Tax Commission has more information here about how residential property is taxed.
  • Utah County does offer some property tax breaks for persons who qualify. Go to Utah County Abatement site for more information.
  • You can use the calculator below to figure out what impact from the bond will be for you (* indicates required items).
Property Value*
(Whole numbers only please)
Property Type*
Estimated Rate
Your estimated property tax increase
Taxable Value
Monthly Amount
Annual Amount

Where do we expect the new City Center to be built?

  • In selecting the option to build a new police and fire headquarters, emergency dispatch center, and new city facilities, the City Council selected bond language that would allow for flexibility in exploring more broadly other downtown locations. Downtown can be defined and quantified in many different ways, but City officials have expressed that the downtown area in this sense was viewed as covering from about 500 North to 600 South, and 500 West to 200 East. The current City Center block offers opportunities for redevelopment, either in conjunction with the construction of a new city hall as a mixed-use development, or as a standalone project if the City pursued a land swap to build the new City Center on a different downtown property.

Why can’t the city just save up for new buildings?

  • The state legislature limits how much cities can hold in reserve for the general fund, which is where the money for a city hall/police facility has to come from. The idea is to keep taxes the city can use for operations low. When a city needs a major capital outlay like a new building, the bonding process requires us to go to the voters rather than just take money from a savings account. It increases transparency and accountability. Cities and school districts often favor bonding because the residents who use the services offered in the new buildings will pay for it. For example, if the City were to save money for a project 15 years in advance, taxpayers in the present may never see the benefit from the saved taxes, especially if a taxpayer were to move away before the project was complete. Taxpayers would also be paying higher taxes than necessary in the present. Equity is a key value in the public sector – those who benefit from city services should pay for them.

Why is Provo City doing this? Why now?

  • Our public safety facilities have critical needs and we need to act now. Some of our needs are approaching, or have passed, the critical point. Due to construction inflation, the costs for a new City Center increase every year.
  • Council considered the following findings identified in the Architectural Nexus 2013 Space Needs Analysis for the existing city offices:
    • Seismic concerns - the building would likely collapse in a seismic event
    • The building systems, especially mechanical, electrical and roofing, are on the cusp of complete failure.
    • The information systems department, a backbone department of the City, is located in a space that would most certainly be lost in a catastrophic event. The cost of relocating this function to another part of the facility would be extremely high and the relocation process extremely difficult to execute.
    • ADA inadequacies
    • Virtually every department within the building lacks adequate space to do its work.
    • Building was already 41 years old in 2013
    • Building security is a serious concern
  • The 2012 Police Space Needs Analysis by McClaren, Wilson and Lawrie, Inc. (MWL) states, “Frankly, the ability of Provo City Center to adapt as well as it has to the sea [of] change of technology and operations of the past thirty years is a tribute to its original planning and ongoing maintenance.”
  • A 2016 structural assessment of the Provo City Center by Ensign Engineering reported, “Repairs now will add a few more years of useful life to the building, but overall the building is structurally outdated, and is not conducive to house emergency or governmental facilities in case of a natural disaster or other regional emergency.” Their summary states, “Because this building was designed and built prior to any significant emphasis on seismic resiliency, and because it houses Provo City’s emergency operations, it is recommended that the entire building be either upgraded to meet the current code mandated seismic performance criteria, or replaced. The citizens of Provo City will be best served if they know their city’s emergency operations facility will remain operational during a major seismic event.”
  • A limited remodel of the city offices still leaves some unresolved concerns:
    • High maintenance costs
      • The complex would need $5 million in upgrades if nothing else.
      • A funding source would need to be identified for those upgrades as this is not currently budgeted for.
    • ‘Kicks the can’ down the road/deferred maintenance
    • The 50-year old city hall has higher operational costs than a newer, more energy efficient building would
    • Parking continues to be a concern

Advisory Panel Success and More Links - 10/29/2013

Our first advisory panel meeting was a big success last Thursday. The meeting was a big reminder to me about why such committees exist. Great insights were shared, points of concern were expressed and key ideas about the planning process were articulated. I asked the panel to review our scope of work for the planning process. This document essentially lists all of the information we need to gather, the research and analysis we need to do and the products we anticipate generating as part of the plan. I'd like to solicit your feedback as well. The link to this document is below. Download it, read it and send your feedback and comments back my way.

Joaquin Neighborhood Plan Scope
I've also added linked to the sidebar on the left. First I've included some selections from the General Plan relating to the Joaquin Neighborhood and a link to the entire general plan page. Next is a link to the Vision 2030 page where you can read about the process and review the documents. More soon.

And We're Live! - 10/22/2013

The Joaquin Neighborhood Plan web page is finally live. As promised during the initial neighborhood meeting, I'll be posting an analysis of what would be required, under the current zoning code, to open a market in the building located on the Northwest corner of 200 North and 400 East.

Also, we'll be having our first advisory panel meeting on Thursday, October 25. Thank you to the following community members who have volunteered to serve. One of the functions of the advisory panel will be to represent the interests and concerns of the neighborhood to planning staff on a frequent basis. As always you can contact me with any questions or concerns you have, but also feel free to talk to the advisory panel members as the planning process continues.

Is There a Parking Problem in Joaquin? - 01/03/2013

It's been too long since the last update. In the interim, staff here in the planning office have done a lot of data collection and mapping. We've counted all the parking including on-street parking (3,147 spaces), we've counted all the housing units by block (2010 Census Data), and we've identified the type of building on every parcel. These data and maps help us understand the neighborhood and make highly informed decisions. Take a look at tables and maps in the Plan Documents section in the quick links to the left.

Now to the topic that has been occupying a great deal of our discussions, parking. The big question is this. Is there a parking problem in the Joaquin neighborhood? If so, does it involve the availability of parking, on-street parking, off-street parking, traffic related to parking or the physical impacts of parking lots? There are other issues I'm sure, but those topics come up the most in our discussions and during advisory panel meetings. The advisory panel and staff have thoroughly studied the issues and come to the consensus that a neighborhood parking permit program is needed. Before you scream or go running to tell your neighbors, take a look at the some of the underlying principles that we've been discussing.

A neighborhood parking program should

  • Be revenue neutral and self-funded
  • Be approved and reviewed by neighborhood residents
  • Be efficiently applied and enforced
  • Reduce parking demand through coordination with infrastructure improvements and alternative transportation modes to make the neighborhood more walkable and connected.
  • Encourage shared parking
  • Minimize initial impact to neighborhood residents.

All of these principles underlay the main goal of such a program, to make Joaquin a better place to live for everyone. Specifics of a plan haven't been studied in earnest but we feel that by following these principles a program can be developed that will benefit everyone, provide revenue to improve the neighborhood and generally make Joaquin a more livable place.

We want to hear from you. Send email comments to jyost@provo.org or call (801) 852-6408.

Additions and Exterior Remodels

man-holding-building-plansIf you want to do an addition or exterior remodel of your commercial structure, you will need to apply for Project Plan Approval. Start by meeting the requirements of and filling out the Project Plan Approval Application and Checklist. Exterior remodels are considered a Minor Project Plan. Start the Minor Project Plan Approval process by meeting the requirements of and filling out the Minor Project Plan Approval Application and Checklist. Keep in mind changes that may require you to upgrade your electrical service or relocate your power meter; view the Electrical Service Upgrade Quick Reference for more information. Submit the application and checklist, along with any required plans, to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. Once the application is received and the fees are paid, your plans will be reviewed by various departments in the city to determine if they meet the code requirements. Certain changes require approval of the City’s Design Review Committee.

Once you have applied for Project Plan Approval or Minor Project Plan Approval, you can apply for your building permit by reviewing and meeting the requirements of the Commercial Plan Requirements Checklist and filling out the Building Permit Application. Submit these documents and any required plans to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. A plan review fee must be paid when you submit your building permit application; all other fees will be paid when the building permit is issued. For questions about the building permit process please call the Building Division at (801) 852-6450. Interior remodels are considered a Tenant Finish and have different requirements. Please refer to the Tenant Finish section for more information.

Additions/Remodels

A building permit is required for all residential additions and remodels. Start by reviewing and meeting the requirements of the Residential Plan Review Checklist for Additions, Remodels, Basement Finishes and Accessory Structures as well as the Building Permit Application. Please keep in mind that your plans should be drawn to professional standards and to scale. If your project is an addition or extensive remodel, engineered plans and Energy Code Analysis will be required. Contact Provo Power at (801) 852-6852 if your plan requires moving the power meter. Submit your plans and any other required documents at the Community Development Department located at 330 W 100 S, Provo. A plan check fee must be paid at the time you apply for your building permit; all other fees are collected when we issue the building permit. After your information is submitted and accepted, your plans will be reviewed by various departments to determine if they meet code requirements. The Zoning Division will review your plans for compliance with setbacks, parking, and lot coverage requirements, as well as changes in occupancy. If you have questions about the zoning requirements, please call (801) 852-6400. When the plans have been approved, we will issue your permit and you can begin construction of your addition or remodel. If you have questions about the building permit process, please call (801) 852-6450.

Airport Construction

small-plane-blue-stripsIf you want to build anything at the airport you will need to start by contacting the Airport Manager at (801) 852-6715. The Airport Manager will determine if your project needs the approval of the Airport Board. If your project does need approval from the Airport Board, your project will be placed on an agenda and will follow the Airport Board’s normal operating procedures. The Airport Board meets quarterly. For more information about the Airport Board visit the Airport Board page.

After getting approval from the Airport Board, you can proceed with your project by submitting an application for Project Plan Approval. Start this process by meeting the requirements of and filling out the Project Plan Approval Application and Checklist. Submit the application, checklist and any other required documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. Once you submit your Project Plan Approval Application, your plans will be reviewed by various departments in the city for code compliance. For questions about the Project Plan Approval process, call the Planning Division at (801) 852-6400.

Once approved, you may begin the building permit process by reviewing and meeting the requirements of the Commercial Plan Requirements Checklist and filling out the Building Permit Application. Submit these and any required documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. A plan review fee must be paid when you submit your building permit application; all other fees will be paid when the building permit is issued. For questions about the building permit process please call the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

Are there any areas of Provo that have specific concerns for builders or developers?

Yes. There are soil problems in specific areas of the city. So far we have not identified many "unbuildable" areas. Some cost more to develop. The north east area is currently being evaluated for small landslides. Provo City Engineering and the State Geological Service are identifying those locations and the standard building plans will have to meet the requirements of the geotechnical reports. All along the mountains there are faults that have to be identified and built around. West of the Freeway there are several high water areas. As we get too close to the lake there are "Wet Lands" that have been identified by the Federal government, those areas are unbuildable.

Data, Data and a Bit More Data - 11/5/2012

Here in the planning office we're almost done gathering two major components of our background research. We've nearly counted up all the parking in the neighborhood. This includes on street parking, off street parking and structured parking in all of the apartment complexes, homes and other buildings in the neighborhood. We're also nearly done with our demographic analysis of the area. We're analyzing many demographic factors from age distribution and household size to housing tenure (rental or owner) and work trip travel mode (car, transit, bike, walk etc.) All of this research will help us understand the neighborhood better and allow us to make recommendations that actually address current conditions and aim for future goals. We are looking forward to our second steering committee meeting this Thursday to get feedback on our work and "ground truth" these findings.

Will anyone put forward a guess of the total number of parking spaces in the neighborhood? Lets have some guesses!

Decks, Fences & Retaining Walls

Decks:
If you want to build a deck that is attached to your home, you will need to get a building permit. You can start by reviewing and meeting the requirements of the Residential Plan Review Checklist for Additions, Remodels, Basement Finishes and Accessory Structures as well as the Building Permit Application. Submit these and any required documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. All plans must be drawn to scale. For questions about getting a building permit for your deck, please call the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

Fences:
Fence heights and types are regulated by the zone in which the property is located. Most residential zones allow six foot high solid fences in the rear and side yards of a property, with a three foot tall solid fence in the front yard. Fences over six feet in height require a building permit. Some commercial zones require masonry walls. Contact the Zoning Division at (801) 852-6400 for information regarding your fence restrictions. If you need a building permit for your fence that is over six feet in height, start by filling out the Building Permit Application and submitting a site plan of the property and engineered plans of the fence including fence height, footings or post size, and wind resistance of up to 90 mph. Submit these documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. For questions about getting a building permit for your fence, please call the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

Retaining Walls:
Retaining walls less than four feet in height, including the 30” footing depth, do not require a building permit but must meet zoning setback requirements. To find out the setback requirements for your zone, please call the Zoning Division at (801) 852-6400. If you want to build a retaining wall that is more than four feet in height, you will need to get a building permit. Start by filling out the Building Permit Application and submitting a site plan of the property and engineered plans of the retaining wall. Submit these documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. For questions about getting a building permit for your retaining wall, please call the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

Demolition

colored-hard-hats-copyAny type of demolition requires a demolition permit. The first step in getting this permit is to contact the Utah Division of Air Quality at (801) 536-4000 or for an asbestos report. The report must be received before a permit can be issued by the Community Development Department. A site plan must be submitted for residential demolition. Submit your site plan and completed Building Permit Application to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. This permit takes approximately one week for approval and requires a minimum $50 building permit fee. Other fees may be assessed by various city departments. This includes removing an electric meter which is usually $200. If power distribution equipment (poles, transformers, etc.) need to be moved, contact Provo Power at (801) 852-6852. Contact Blue Stakes at (801) 662-4111 prior to demolition.

Does Provo City do Fast Track and/or Deferred Submittal permits?

Provo City does not encourage fast track construction. Special cases will be reviewed and may be approved to facilitate construction. The construction documents submitted must include all areas proposed for fast track construction.

Fire Rebuild/Repair

Replacing or repairing buildings that have been destroyed by a fire always requires a building permit. The Fire Department and Building Division will be involved in determining the extent of repair or replacement. An inspection by the Building Division will determine if power can be restored to the structure, and if an engineer will be needed to design structural fixes. Building permit costs vary depending on the extent of the damage. Start the building permit process by reviewing and meeting the requirements of the Residential Plan Requirements Checklist and the Building Permit Application. Submit these and any required plans to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. All plans must be drawn to scale. Photos can be submitted with the plans to aid in describing the type of work being done. For questions about getting a building permit for your fire rebuild, please call the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

Historic Property Renovation

Knight-Mangum-HousePrior to beginning exterior work on a property listed in the Provo Landmarks Register, fill out and submit an application for a Landmarks Commission Certificate of Appropriateness to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. If the proposed work requires a hearing before the Landmarks Commission, the application will be placed on the next available Landmarks Commission Agenda. Landmarks Commission meetings are generally held monthly. If the application can be approved administratively, staff has ten days to render an administrative decision after an application has been accepted and deemed complete.

After a property has been listed in the Provo Landmarks Register, no alteration of the exterior appearance of any structure, site, or object within the property shall be made or permitted until after an application for a Certificate of Appropriateness has been submitted to and approved by the Landmarks Commission, or the Landmarks Commission staff.

Certificates of Appropriateness shall be required for alterations such as, but not limited to:

  • Any construction that requires a building permit;
  • Removal and replacement or alteration of architectural detailing, such as porch columns, railing, window moldings, cornices and siding;
  • Roof replacement or re-roofing;
  • Relocation of a structure or object on the same site or to another site;
  • Construction of additions or decks;
  • Alteration or construction of accessory structures, such as garages, carports, sheds, etc.;
  • Alteration of windows and doors, including replacement or changes in fenestration patterns;
  • Construction or alteration of porches:
  • Construction or alteration of porches;
  • Masonry work, including, but not limited to, re-pointing, paint removal and cleaning;
  • Construction or alteration of site features including, but not limited to, fencing, walls, paving and grading;
  • Installation or alteration of any exterior sign;
  • Any demolition;
  • Change or exterior paint color; and
  • New Construction.

The following types of construction or demolition may be decided administratively by the Landmarks Commission staff subject to the standards adopted in Provo City Code Title 16:

  • Minor alterations, repairs, or additions to a Landmark or Contributory Building or Site in a historic district;
  • Alterations, repairs or additions to a Non-Contributory Building or Site in a historic district;
  • Any alterations or demolition of an accessory structure; and
  • Demolition of a Non-Contributory Building or Site in a historic district.

For questions about renovating a historic property, please call Josh Yost in the Planning Division at (801) 852-6408.

Kick-Off Success!

public-involve Kick-Off Success! On 13 January 2015 a kick-off meeting was held where over 70 residents and stakeholders came to provide initial input to the planning process. As of today, hundreds of survey responses have already been received!

It is evident that this area has many talented and valued members of the community that are very involved. If you haven’t done it yet, take the survey. We’d love to hear from you! We are gearing up to assemble the advisory committee from those of you who have responded. The selection process will begin on 26 January 2015, so if you would like to participate, please let us know.

 

Multi-Family Residential Buildings

6-people-meetingIn order to build a multi-family residential project, you will need to apply for Project Plan Approval. Before beginning that process, several initial questions must be asked:

(1) Does the current zone support your desired use and density? If the answer is yes, move to the next question. If the answer is no, then you will need to apply for a zone map amendment. Start by speaking to a Planner in Community Development at (801) 852-6400. The City has various zones that allow multi-family housing and it may make more sense for you to build the project in one of those zones. If you find that you need a zone map amendment, you will want to start that process by meeting the requirements of and filling out the Zone Map Amendment Application and Checklist. Submit this and any required documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. All zone map amendments must be heard by the Planning Commission and approved by the Municipal Council. For questions about the zone map amendment process please call the Planning Division at (801) 852-6400.

(2) Is the project intended for married couples or single-individual housing, and how many bedrooms per unit do you want to build?  These two elements determine how many parking spaces will be required for the project, and will impact the design of your project.

(3) Are these units going to be apartments or do you want the units to be privately owned? A subdivision plat will be required with any multi-family development; however, if you want to sell individual units then a Condominium plat or PUD will be required along with the Project Plan review. There is a separate Condominium application and approval process which you will need to apply for after receiving your project plan approval. Start this process by meeting the requirements of and filling out the Condominium Application and Checklist. Submit these and any required documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. For questions about the Condominium approval process please call the Planning Division at (801) 852-6400.

(4) Can you afford to hire an Architect and Civil Engineer to design plans for the City to review? Professionally drawn plans will be required as part of this application.

These initial four questions are generally the most important to answer before moving forward. When you’re ready to begin the project plan approval process, start by meeting the requirements of and filling out the Project Plan Approval Application and Checklist. Be sure to meet the Electrical Residential Specifications for power. Submit this and any required documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. The project plan approval is a technical review of the civil and architectural plans submitted for the project. Your application will be routed to various departments for review and approval. Project plan and plat approval must be obtained prior to getting a building permit. For questions about the project plan approval process please call the Planning Division at (801) 852-6400.

Once you have completed the Project Plan process you can begin the building permit process. You will start by reviewing and meeting the requirements of the Commercial Plan Review Checklist and filling out the Building Permit Application. Submit this and any required documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. A plan check fee must be paid at the time you apply for your building permit; all other fees are collected when we issue the building permit. After your information is submitted and accepted, your plans will be reviewed by various departments to determine if they meet code requirements. When the plans have been approved, we will issue your permit and you can begin construction of your multi-family residential project. If you have questions about the building permit process, please call the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

New Construction

All new commercial construction requires Project Plan Approval. Before you submit an application you will want to determine if your intended use is allowed in the zone where the property is located. If the use is not permitted in the zone,  you can contact a Planner at (801) 852-6400 to discuss possible options to resolve that conflict. If your project requires a division of land, you will want to begin with the Subdivision Plat Approval process. See instructions for that process under the Subdivision section. Start the Project Plan Approval process by meeting the requirements of and filling out the Project Plan Approval Application and Checklist. You should also review the Commercial Specifications for electric service and contact Provo Power at (801) 852-6852 to get a site specific layout/design and estimates on line extensions. Submit the application and checklist, along with any required plans, to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. Once the application is received and the fees are paid, your plans will be reviewed by various departments in the city to determine if they meet the code requirements. Certain projects require approval of the City’s Design Review Committee. Once your project has been approved you will be required to post a bond for on- and off-site improvements and begin your building permit process. If you have questions about the project plan approval process you can contact the Planning Division at (801) 852-6400.

Once you have applied for Project Plan Approval you can apply for your building permit. Start the building permit process by reviewing and meeting the requirements of the Commercial Plan Requirements Checklist and completing the Building Permit Application. Submit these and any required documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. A plan review fee must be paid when you submit your building permit application; all other fees will be paid when the building permit is issued. For questions about the building permit process please call the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

New Construction

A building permit is required for all new residential structures. To begin, you will want to review and meet the requirements of the Residential Plan Review Checklist as well as the Building Permit Application. Please keep in mind that your plans should be drawn to professional standards and to scale. Be sure to follow the Electrical Residential Specifications for the project’s power. Submit your plans to the Community Development Department located at 330 W 100 S, Provo. A plan check fee must be paid at the time you apply for your building permit; all other fees are collected when we issue the building permit. After your information is submitted and accepted, your plans will be reviewed by various departments to determine if they meet code requirements and to determine the permit fees. When the plans have been approved, we will issue your permit and you can begin construction of your new residence. If you have questions about the building permit process, please call (801) 852-6450.

Online Survey Closed - Draft in Progress

Thank you to all who participated in the online survey. We received a remarkable number of responses that will be highly valuable to the planning process as we begin drafting the plan. Due to the high response rate we received from the community and the Citizen Advisory Committee, Staff has begun to draft a plan. Look in the next few months for an invitation to review the draft and provide further comment.

Parking Counted...(Almost) - 11/13/2013

We've counted all the parking in the Joaquin Neighborhood, off-street parking that is. The planning staff has counted every parking spot, excluding all of the parking on the street. The grand total is 12,744 spaces. This total includes many different land uses but the majority of it is parking for residential units. The table below breaks out these numbers.

 

Joaquin Parking Inventory
 Land Use
 Parcels Parking
Units
Parking/Unit
 Civic  5  546 -
 -
 Commercial  19  450  -  -
 Mixed Use
 3  727  305  2.4
 Office  1  24  -  -
 Parking Lot
 11  1,125  -  -
 Religious  5  212  -  -
 Residential  949  9,660  4,384  2.2
 Totals  993 12,744
 4689 2.3
 As you can see, just counting the parking spaces dedicated to residential use results in an average of 2.2 stalls per residential unit. To give more context to this number, the total 2010 population of Joaquin was 14,742. This would be 1 parking stall for every 1.16 persons. Thinking about it spatially, 12,744 parking spaces, using a conservative estimate of 300 square feet per stall (this is an average including all the circulation area in a parking lot), equates to 3,823,200 square feet, which is 87.77 acres, 66.38 football fields or 19.4 Walmart SuperCenters. This was a wow moment for us. All of us here would propose that there is probably enough parking to go around. Remember, we haven't even counted all the on-street parking yet. Take a moment to think about the impact on the neighborhood of all this space we use to store our cars. One last piece of data, parking area is equal to roughly 23% of the land area of the Joaquin Neighborhood--23%

 

Pools

For all commercial pools, start the building permit process by contacting Utah County Health Department at (801) 851-7525 to get their approval before you apply for your building permit. It is likely that your commercial pool is part of a larger project; therefore you will also need to go through the Project Plan Approval process. For more information on this process please see the New Construction section. Please note that all commercial pools require a separate building permit. Start the permit process by filling out the Building Permit Application and submitting it with your pool plans to the Building Division of the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. If you have questions about getting a building permit for your pool, please contact the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

Pools

If you want to install a pool, whether indoor or outdoor, you will need to get a building permit. Outdoor pools must be surrounded by a wall or fence with a minimum height of six feet, and must be a minimum of five feet from the side and rear property lines. The fence or wall surrounding the outdoor pool must not have openings that allow passage of a 4” sphere, and any gates leading to the pool area must be automatic, self-closing and latching. For indoor pools, the structure enclosing the pool must comply with the requirements of an accessory building. For more information regarding a building permit for a pool, please refer to our Swimming Pool Requirements handout or call the Building Division at (801) 852-6450. For a commercial pool, you must begin the permit process with the Utah County Health Department, contact them at (801) 851-7525.

Restaurants

If you would like to build a restaurant or install a restaurant in an existing building, you will begin the process by contacting the Zoning Division at (801) 852-6400 to determine if your restaurant is an approved use in the zone where the property is located. Once you have determined that the restaurant is allowed in the zone, you will want to contact the Utah County Health Department at (801) 851-7525 for a Food Service Plan Review. You will also want to check with the Planning Division to determine if your project will require major or minor Project Plan Review Approval. If it does, then you must complete that process before obtaining a building permit. For more information on the Project Plan Approval process see the New Construction or Tenant Finish sections. When you are ready to begin the building permit process you will begin by reviewing and meeting the requirements of the Commercial Plan Requirements Checklist (new construction) or the Commercial Plan Review Checklist for Tenant Finish and completing the Building Permit Application. Submit these and any required documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. You must submit the Food Service Plan Review from the Health Department with your application. A Plan Review Fee must be paid when you submit your building permit application. All other fees will be paid when the building permit is issued. For questions about the building permit process please call the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

Shed/Accessory Building

  • Accessory buildings fewer than 200 sq. feet do not require a building permit; however, there are setback requirements (required distances from property lines) and height requirements for the zone where the property is located. Most residential zones allow sheds and other accessory buildings to be built three feet inside a property line only if the structure is more than six feet away from the main dwelling, and not more than twelve feet high. Please contact the Zoning Division at (801) 852-6400 to check for your setback requirements before you build. You will also want to be aware of any current utilities or public right-of-ways before you make any changes. Contact Provo Power at (801) 852-6852 for information about utilities and right-of-ways.
  • Accessory buildings over 200 sq. feet require a building permit. In addition to meeting the requirements of the zone where the property is located, a set of engineered construction drawings of the proposed building should be submitted to the Community Development Department for review. Start by reviewing and meeting the requirements of the Residential Plan Review Checklist for Additions, Remodels, Basement Finishes and Accessory Structures as well as the Building Permit Application. Please keep in mind that your plans should be drawn to professional standards and to scale. Submit your plans at the Community Development Department located at 330 W 100 S, Provo. If you have questions or need more information, please contact the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

Subdivisions

If you want to create a new parcel of land for constructing a residence, you will need to go through the subdivision plat approval process. To start the process of subdividing a piece of property, you will need to fill out and meet the requirements of the Preliminary Subdivision Application and Checklist. You may also need to review the Commercial Specifications for electric service and contact Provo Power at (801) 852-6852 to get a site specific layout/design and estimates on line extensions, depending on how many lots will be in your subdivision. Submit these and any required documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. Once your application and plans are received, they will be reviewed by various city departments to determine if they meet the code requirements. Subdivision plans require approval in a public hearing, either before the City’s Planning Commission or an Administrative Hearing Officer. As part of the approval process, a bond must be posted with the City that guarantees that necessary improvements like curb, gutter and sidewalks will be installed. For questions about starting the subdivision plat approval process, please contact the Planning Division at (801) 852-6400.

Subdivisions

If you want to create a new parcel of land for a commercial construction project, you will need to get approval of a subdivision plat. Start by filling out and meeting the requirements of the Preliminary Subdivision Application and Checklist. Submit these and any required documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. You should also review the Commercial Specifications for electric service and contact Provo Power at (801) 852-6852 to get a site specific layout/design and estimates on line extensions. Once the application is received and the fees are paid, your plans will be reviewed by various departments in the city to determine if they meet the code requirements. Subdivision plats require approval in a public hearing, either before the City’s Planning Commission or an Administrative Hearing Officer. As part of the approval process, a bond must be posted with the City that guarantees that necessary improvements like curb, gutter and sidewalks will be installed. For questions about starting the subdivision plat approval process, please contact the Planning Division at (801) 852-6400. Once your subdivision plat is approved you can begin the Project Plan Approval process. For information on this process see the New Construction section.

Tenant Finish (Interior Remodel)

A Tenant Finish is construction that takes place within the interior of a building that is already completed; and only to complete a certain space within the building for a business to occupy. All tenant finishes require a building permit. Start by reviewing and meeting the requirements of the Commercial Plan Review Checklist for Tenant Finish and the Building Permit Application. If the new use requires additional power you may need to upgrade your service, view the Electrical Service Upgrade Quick Reference for more information. Submit these and any required documents to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. Before applying for a building permit it would be a good idea to first check with the Zoning Division to make sure that the type of business you want to conduct is allowed in the zone where the property is located; and make sure you have a business license to operate your business in Provo City. For questions on getting a building permit for your tenant finish, please contact the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

Utility Service Changes

Electrical Service Changes:
If you need to make changes to your residential electrical service you will need to get a building permit; however, you will start the process by scheduling a pre-inspection with the Building Division. Each property will have different requirements due to meter location, trees, accessory buildings, etc. The pre-inspection will determine what will be best way to make the change based on all these factors; it helps eliminate the possibility of having to move your electrical equipment a second time if it is first installed in a location that does not meet all the code requirements. Start the permit process by completing the Building Permit Application and submit it to the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. Schedule the pre-inspection by calling the Building Division at (801) 852-6450. There is an inspection fee of $75 which can be included in the building permit fees. The building permit fees vary based on service size, overhead or underground connection and other factors. If the changes to your residential structure require upgrading your power needs, consult the Electrical Service Change Quick Reference to see all the necessary specifications.

Gas Line Service Changes:
Residential: A mechanical permit is required if you want to have a gas meter set or upgraded to a 2 lb. meter. Start the permit process by filling out the Building Permit Application and submitting it to the Building Division of the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. You can also fax or email your permit worksheet to (801) 852-6417 or btaylor@provo.org. The minimum permit fee is $50, credit card payments can be made over the phone by calling (801) 852-6400. Permits can be issued the same day you apply. When you have completed the work, you will need to call for an inspection to ensure that the work meets the code requirements. If the inspector finds that the work doesn’t meet code requirements they will explain why and give you time to fix it. A re-inspection will be required. To schedule an inspection or re-inspection, please call the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

Utility Service Changes

Contact Questar Gas at (801) 853-7400 before beginning the permit process to discuss plans for upgrading your service. After you talk to Questar, you can start the permit process by filling out the Building Permit Application and submitting it to the Building Division of the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. You can also fax or email your permit application to (801) 852-6417 or btaylor@provo.org. The minimum permit fee is $50, credit card payments can be made over the phone by calling (801) 852-6400.

Visual Preference Survey Results

Water Heater, Furnace, Air Conditioner Installation or Replacement

Replacing water heaters, furnaces and air conditioning requires a building permit. Start the permit process by filling out the Building Permit Application and submitting it to the Building Division of the Community Development Department at 330 W 100 S, Provo. You can also fax or email your permit worksheet to (801) 852-6417 or btaylor@provo.org. The minimum permit fee is $50, credit card payments can be made over the phone by calling (801) 852-6400. Permits can be issued the same day you apply. When you have completed the work, you will need to call for an inspection to ensure that the work done meets the code requirements. If the inspector finds that the work doesn’t meet code requirements they will explain why and give you time to fix it. A re-inspection will be required. To schedule an inspection please call the Building Division at (801) 852-6450.

What are the current building codes?

Utah State and Provo City have adopted the following building codes as of July 1, 2016:

International Building Code 2015 Edition

International Mechanical Code 2015 Edition

International Plumbing Code 2015 Edition

National Electric Code 2014 Edition

International Fuel Gas Code 2015 Edition

International Residential Code 2015 Edition

International Fire Code 2015 Edition

International Energy Conservation Code 2015 Edition

Accessibility ICC/ANSI A117.1 - 2009

What happens when a zoning violation is reported to the City?

  • First, a zoning officer determines if a zoning violation exists.
  • If the zoning officer determines the property is not in compliance with City zoning ordinances, a notice of violation is sent to the property owner.  The notice includes a time frame to bring the property into compliance.
  • If the time frame elapses without compliance, the case is referred to the City’s Legal Department. 
  • The Legal Department issues a letter informing the property owner that the City intends to file criminal charges.
  • Most cases are resolved without the need to file a criminal action with the courts. 

What information is required on the building plans?

The Building in Provo page will help you determine what is required based on the type of project.

What is the cost of a Building Permit?

The permit cost is based on the cost (valuation) of the construction. We use a table found in the 1997 UBC to assess the permit fees. The permit cost is mainly used to cover the cost of the inspections.

A plan check fee of 65% of the building permit fee is charged to cover the cost of reviewing a plan before the permit is issued. The plans are checked for problems drawn on the plan that must be corrected or missing information that must be added.

A state fee of 1% of the building permit fee is charged and sent to the state for training of inspectors and contractors.

Other city departments assess fees based on various factors of each project.

When is a Building Permit required?

The 2015 International Residential Code Section R105.1 states, “Any owner or authorized agent who intends to construct, enlarge, alter, repair, move, demolish or change the occupancy of a structure, or to erect, install, enlarge, alter, repair, remove, convert or replace any electrical, gas, mechanical or plumbing system, the installation of which is regulated by this code, or to cause any such work to be done, shall first make application to the building official and obtain the required permit.”

Who can prepare building plans?

All commercial projects greater than 3,000 square feet in size, Per Title 58, Chapter 3a, Utah Code Annotated 1953, are required to be drawn by a Utah State Licensed Architect.

A single family home or garage can be drawn by anyone as long as they are to ¼” scale, legible, all rooms clearly labeled as to their use, and meet all the requirements of the Residential Plan Review Checklist. Generally, a larger single family home will require structural engineering calculations and connection details by a Utah Licensed Engineer. 

Poorly drawn plans will not be accepted and will have to be redone by a draftsman or other qualified professional.

Can I purchase a half season?

No, we require season ticket holders to purchase a full season to get the discount associated with season ticket purchases. 

Age and Household Demographic

 HOUSEHOLDS
 Households 31,578
 Families 31,166
 AGE
 Under 18
 22.3%
 18-24 36.4%
 25-44 24.8%
 45-64 10.5%
 65-older   5.8%
 Median Age
 23.3
 ETHNICITY
 White
77.5%
 Hispanic15/2%
 Asian 2.5%
 Pacific Islander
 1.1%
 African American
 0.7%
 American Indian
 0.8%
 Other 2.2%
  

Business

 BUSINESS
 Total Number of Firms 2007
 8,505
 Women-owned Firms 2007
 27.1%
 Hispanic-owned Firms 2007
 4.9%
 Asian-owned Firms 2007
 2.2%
 Retail Sales 2007 ($1000)
 1,202,471
 Merchant Wholesaler Sales 2007 ($1000)
 619,518
 Manufacturers Shipments, 2007 ($1000)
 416,595
  
 BUILDING SPACE
 Total Square Ft - Office
 3,402,937
 Total Square Ft - Retail
 2,867,311
 Total Square Ft - Industrial
 4,731,811
 Office Vacancy Rates
 20%
 Retail Vacancy Rates
 9.10%
 Industrial Vacancy Rates
 2.70%
 Office Lease Rate
 $16.25 FS
 Industrial Lease Rate
 $  0.42 NNN monthly
 Retail Lease Rate
 $15.25 NNN psf
  

Community Investment

CONSTRUCTION TYPE
PERMITS ISSUED OCT 2013
VALUATION
2013 YTD PERMITS
VALUATION
2012 TOTAL PERMITS
VALUATON
Residential New 1 Unit
6
$1,472,165
 125 $22,484,36970
$15,438,933
Residential Two Units
0
0
3
$479,800
1
$31,663,691
Residential Remodels & Additions
 26$703,055
 179$6,544,208
 196$5,032,790
Commercial New
1
$550,000
12
$107,623,153
20
$51,243,450
Commercial Remodels & Additions
 14 $3,863,153 87$90,358,138
121
$48,830,953
       
       

Education

 EDUCATION
 Public Schools
 12
 Students 13,385
 Charter Schools
 2
 Graduation Rate
 78%
 Average Composite ACT
 20.9
 Adults  college courses
 35.90%
 Adults w/BA or higher
 39.50%
 Adults w/graduate degree
 12.00%
 # Brigham Young University Students
 34,000
 # Utah Valley University
 32,670

Housing

 HOUSING STATISTICS
 Households
 31,578
 Home Ownership Rate (2007-2011)
 42.5%
 Housing Units - Multi Family
 45.4%
 Median Value of Owner-occupied Housing Units
 $213,000
 Persons per household (2007-2011)
 3.25
 Median Household Income (2007-2011)
 $39,782
 Per Capita Money Income in the Past 12 Months (2011 dollars)
 $16,631
  

Job Growth

 JOB GROWTH IN PROVO
 Increase in non-agricultural jobs in 2013
 3.50 %
 43,200 jobs
 Unemployment Rate (August 2013)
 4.9% 
   

Utility Costs

 PROVO POWER RATES
 General Service Distribution Voltage EL15, EL16, #L17, EL18
 Customer Service Charge
 $28.71
 Energy Charge All kWh
 $0.0424 per kWh
 Demand Charge 0-5 kW
 $7.65 per kW
 Demand Charge All Additional
 $13.67 kW
  
 WATER RATES
 Commodity Charge - Summer
 $0.884.per 1,000 gallons
 Commodity Charge - Winter
 $0.528 per 1,000 gallons

Can a customer opt-out?

It is the plan of Provo Power to offer an opt-out program, however this is still to be decided by the Municipal Council. Upon approval, if a customer chooses to opt-out of having a smart meter installed, a monthly fee will be charged in addition to the utility bill to pay for an employee and equipment needed to read the meter every month.

Is an AMI Network safe?

There are many concerns about the use of AMI meters and if the radio frequency (RF) utilized for the communications is safe. The AMI Network utilizes radio frequency communications and fully complies with the United States Federal Communications Commission’s rules for safe use.

An AMI meter uses about 900MHz for only about 45-60 seconds a day. A common comparison of something that uses similar RF is a cordless phone or a baby monitor – both utilizing about 900MHz. There are many other comparisons available, including higher RF items like a Wireless Laptop, Cellphone, Infrared Remote Controls, Microwave Ovens, X-Rays, etc. The common concern of health related issues attributed to the use of a AMI meter have never been proven, and on the contrary, the FDA says that available scientific evidence shows no increased health risk due to the use or exposure of RF. The findings of the FDA and other studies can be found below.
FDA Consumer Information
Radio Frequency Radiation and Health: Smart Meters 

Is an AMI Network secure?

The AMI Network and system is built so that the communications from the meter are sent directly to the utility for billing and electrical purposes only. The City of Provo and Provo Power abides by the Utah State Code 5-552a to keep records confidential, and in no way can the City of Provo or Provo Power share or use the information of a customer except pursuant to legal affidavits or subpoenas.

The Information Technology (IT) security controls Provo Power plans to put in place for AMI meters reflects energy industry best practices. They are designed to provide a very high level of assurance that our systems cannot be compromised. Provo Power considers security a top priority. We take all reasonable and necessary steps to ensure the services we provide our customers are not only high quality and easily available, but also extremely secure.

What are the benefits of an AMI Network?

Benefits to the Customer:

  • Accurate real time data
  • Ability to monitor and use as a resource for energy conservation
  • Instant notification to Provo Power of a power failure
  • Instant connect/disconnect/verification reads, etc.
  • Preferred billing date
  • Improve outage restoration processes
  • Efficient customer service

Benefits to Provo Power:

  • Updates an aging and outdated Infrastructure
  • Equips the system for increasing power demand
  • Decreases durations of power outages & improves restoration processes
  • Real-time data and troubleshooting
  • Reduces and/or delays the need for more power resources
  • Reduction of operation costs
  • Improve load and voltage operations
  • Remote connect/disconnect/verification reads, etc.
  • Efficient customer service
  • Energy conservation/load control
  • Future applications

What if I see power lines that are down?

Call 911 immediately, then call 311 to report it.

What is an AMI Network?

An AMI Network is the use of connected meters equipped with 2-way communications for the use of calculating electrical consumption. Every home and business in the City of Provo has an electrical meter for this same purpose, however installing a new state of the art AMI meter enables the customer a way to track their energy consumption, and enables the utility to enhance the overall power infrastructure of the city.

Part of being able to offer reliable electrical service includes changing and utilizing state of the art technology and equipment for the benefit of the customers. Provo Power has studied and investigated an AMI Network for over 10 years. The network and capabilities offered by an AMI Network can enhance the overall customer service experience and can advance power reliability and efficiency.

What should I do if my lights go out?

First, check to see if your neighbor's power is out as well. If so, please contact us immediately at 311, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

 

Where do I pay my power bill?

You can pay online or by visiting customer service in 351 W Center Street.

Who's receiving AMI meters?

AMI meters will be provided to all customers of Provo Power and is considered a service upgrade with no additional costs to the customer for the meter.

Why has the AMI selection taken 10 years?

Provo Power has issued 3 separate Requests for Proposals (RFP’s) to vendors over the years regarding implementation of an AMI Network. When taking into consideration the costs, benefits and overall system performance, it was believed that the technology wasn’t up to the standards and criteria of Provo Power in the past.

At this time, with technological advances, system integration and options, costs, and the performance of an AMI Network have all met the said standards and criteria of Provo Power. With the support of the Energy Board Members, City Administration and Municipal Council, Provo Power will be implementing and rolling out an AMI Network throughout the city over the next three years.

Will AMI meters give the utility control over my electric usage?

No. The ami grid is about giving customers—not the utility company—control over their power bills. AMI meters do not transmit personal identification information about customers, and they can't identify—or control—the appliances you're using. Plus, state law (Utah State Code 5-552a) rules that the utility, their contractors or agents, and any third party cannot sell a customer's personal information, such as name, address, telephone number, and data about electricity usage.

Will the AMI network change my utility charges?

The proposed AMI Network has been planned for and budgeted for the last 8 years already, so there is no added cost to the customer to have an AMI meter installed. 

How do I become a sponsor for an event?


How do I become a vendor at an event?


How do I nominate myself or someone else to serve on a Provo City Board?

Nominate yourself or someone else to serve on a Provo City Board by filling out the online application located on each board's webpage. Learn more »

How do I volunteer for an event?


How does 1 Gb compare to other common speeds?

The following table shows “common” speeds by connection type / technology in megabits per second (Mbps).

table3

Lap Lane Availability

Membership Refund Policies

When purchasing a membership to the Provo Recreation Center, the purchaser receives a discount when joining for a set term. If that contract term is not honored through cancellation, a penalty will be incurred.

Memberships Paid In Advance
Refunds will be based on a set monthly fee. The monthly fee, multiplied by how many months have passed since purchase, will be subtracted from the amount paid.
Monthly Refund Fee Amounts
• Youth/Senior $30
• Adult/Senior Couple $40
• Adult Couple $50

• Family $60

Memberships on Monthly Payments
Notification must be given at least one week before the next scheduled payment is due. Notice of cancellation must be received at least one week prior to the payment due date, or that payment will be charged. A cancellation fee will be charged to cancel the monthly payment contract. The cancellation fee must be paid before membership will be canceled.
Cancellation Fee to End Membership
• Youth/Senior $40
• Adult/Senior Couple $50
• Adult Couple $80
• Family $90

What are the refund policies?

For programs, full refunds will be given until the first day of class. After that, no refunds given.

What does 1Gb actually correspond to in real life usage? For example, how many web pages, emails or videos is this?

It’s hard to give exact figures – for example every web page differs in size depending on the amount of text, images and other multimedia content within it. Also, whilst most e-mail messages are small in size, they can also be fairly large if they include attachments such as photos. In the following table, we’ve taken “typical” usage and provided a number of “What (how many X) can be done (downloaded) in approximately 1 second.”

table1

What is the difference between GB and Gb?

In the computer world it is “common” practice to use a large B = Bytes while the small b = bits. It takes 8 bits to equal a byte. This means that 1 GB = 8 Gb.

table2

What is the project?

The Utah Transit Authority (UTA) and the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) are proposing to build a bus rapid transit (BRT) system through Provo and Orem.  The Provo-Orem BRT is a multimodal project that addresses transit as well as roadway infrastructure needs.  The preferred alternative, as defined through the environmental assessment process, completed in 2011, connects the Orem Intermodal Center, Utah Valley University, the University Mall area, Brigham Young University, high density student housing areas, downtown Provo, the Provo Intermodal Center, the Provo Towne Centre Mall and the East Bay Business Park.  The buses will travel about half of the route in dedicated lanes with signal prioritization.

When they say 1 GB do they always mean one gigabyte?


Unfortunately no. Some groups (e.g. marketing companies) forget or get mixed up that there is a technical difference between 1GB and 1Gb. As such it is sometimes the case that a statement of 1GB NETWORK actually means one gigabit (1Gb looks funny in titles etc. so they change it to look “pretty”).

NOTE: Network connections are generally listed as BITS per second while file sizes are listed in BYTES. How does this relate to real life? A 1 GB (Gigabyte) file will take at least 8 seconds to download on a 1 Gb (Gigabit) connection (there are other aspects to networking that increase the time here however, to keep things “simple”, we have left the complexities of networking out of this comment).

 

 


Who can actually read 125,000 emails or 1,250 web pages each second? Isn’t this overkill?


There was a time when individuals thought 64Kb of RAM was more than could ever be used. Within a few years those limits were far from sufficient. Although it is not realistic for a single individual to read 125,000 emails each second, we must be ready to handle the next generation of service development. After all, we ARE on the cusp of green fields development that promises to deliver super high definition video, audio, and data for both business and home usage. Unfortunately the widely available “broadband” service speeds of today are not enough to handle these next generation technologies.

NOTE: While 1Gb takes care of us for our understood near future needs we should not be surprised when 10Gb, 100Gb, and even 1Tb connections become the mainstay connection speeds of the future. Enjoy the ride!

table5


Does the ombudsman give legal advice?

The ombudsman does not provide legal advice or services.

Is there a fee for ombudsman services?

No, this service is provided at no cost to the residents of Provo or other citizens who are concerned with issues in Provo.

What are some common types of complaints for the ombudsman?

General nuisance complaints are commonly reported to the ombudsman including weeds, junk, abandoned vehicles, potholes, animals at large, street lighting, damaged sidewalks, odor problems, and many others. 

What does the ombudsman do?

The ombudsman receives complaints or concerns from individuals or groups either by phone, by mail or in person.  The ombudsman will then investigate the details of the complaint and possibly refer the complaint to the appropriate City department for resolution.  All complaints may not be resolved due to economic constraints or other possible mitigating circumstances.

What is an Ombudsman

An ombudsman is a liaison or mediator between citizens and government agencies.  The ombudsman is a neutral party that will aid citizens of Provo in resolving conflicts and seeking solutions to issues by fact-finding, investigating, and problem solving.  The ombudsman is your advocate in dealing with City government.

What kinds of complaints can the ombudsman work to resolve?

The ombudsman will receive complaints related to any City Department.  City Departments include: Administration, Administrative Services (Finance, Human Resources, Information Services, Justice Court), Community Development (Building Inspection,  Planning  & Zoning),  Economic Development, Energy, Engineering, Fire, Legal, Parks, Police, Public Works, Redevelopment, Sanitation, Streets, Storm Water, and Water Resources.

Will the ombudsman help with landlord - tenant disputes?

The Provo City ombudsman is a resource for concerns dealing with Provo City government.  Civil or private contracts or agreements are not within the jurisdiction of Provo City government, and as such, must be resolved by civil means.

Are recreational fires allowed in Provo City limits?

Do you live in a Wildland Interface area?

How do I fill out a GRAMA request?

How do I register for a Community CPR Class?

Information on CPR/First Aid/ AED classes can be found in this document

How do I schedule a Daycare Inspection

How do I signup for CERT training?

SIGN UP FOR NOTIFICATIONS

Create an account and add your contact and location information into the Mass Notification system. All information you provide will be kept strictly confidential.

STOP RECEIVING NOTIFICATIONS

You can stop receiving at any time by removing your contact information from your profile.

What activities are scheduled for Fire Prevention Week?

What are the limits of home fuel storage?

What information is available for Family Emergency Preparedness?

What is required to install a Knox Box key box for commercial properties?

What is Specific Information

Often we give tours to groups who have specific goals in mind, for example Boy Scout groups, or Emergency Preparedness groups. Just let us know what you would like us to cover so we can better serve your needs.

What is the Community Alert Notification System?

This service allows you to sign up to get notifications from within several designated categories. These categories will provide information on city events, programs, meeting agendas and reminders of special meetings.  Other information may include reminders about voter registration deadlines, road closures, recreation programs, and other city events. Subscribers will be able to receive messages on their home phone, mobile phone, email or text message. 

What is the Emergency Alert Notification System?

The Emergency Alert system allows local officials to help protect lives and property by providing critical information to residents during emergencies, including dangerous situations.  The system allows the Police and Fire Departments to quickly send out an emergency alert to residents in any affected geographic area in the city.  Depending on the emergency, the alert may be sent to the entire city or selected areas within the city.  The current database includes only traditional wire-line telephone (the “land line” phone you may have in your home).  If you want the system to send alerts to other communication devices that you use, you will have to provide your contact information by logging into the system and sign up for alerts.

What is the Fireworks Discharge Restriction Area?

What Open Fire and Fireworks Restrictions are in place?

Does the ombudsman give legal advice?

The ombudsman does not provide legal advice or services.

Is there a fee for ombudsman services?

No, this service is provided at no cost to the residents of Provo or other citizens who are concerned with issues in Provo.

What are some common types of complaints for the ombudsman?

General nuisance complaints are commonly reported to the ombudsman including weeds, junk, abandoned vehicles, potholes, animals at large, street lighting, damaged sidewalks, odor problems, and many others. 

What does the ombudsman do?

The ombudsman receives complaints or concerns from individuals or groups either by phone, by mail or in person.  The ombudsman will then investigate the details of the complaint and possibly refer the complaint to the appropriate City department for resolution.  All complaints may not be resolved due to economic constraints or other possible mitigating circumstances.

What is an Ombudsman

An ombudsman is a liaison or mediator between citizens and government agencies.  The ombudsman is a neutral party that will aid citizens of Provo in resolving conflicts and seeking solutions to issues by fact-finding, investigating, and problem solving.  The ombudsman is your advocate in dealing with City government.

What kinds of complaints can the ombudsman work to resolve?

The ombudsman will receive complaints related to any City Department.  City Departments include: Administration, Administrative Services (Finance, Human Resources, Information Services, Justice Court), Community Development (Building Inspection,  Planning  & Zoning),  Economic Development, Energy, Engineering, Fire, Legal, Parks, Police, Public Works, Redevelopment, Sanitation, Streets, Storm Water, and Water Resources.

Will the ombudsman help with landlord - tenant disputes?

The Provo City ombudsman is a resource for concerns dealing with Provo City government.  Civil or private contracts or agreements are not within the jurisdiction of Provo City government, and as such, must be resolved by civil means.

Can I contest my ticket?

Yes. To do this, you must appear at the courthouse to speak with a Traffic Clerk and sign for a court date.

Contact Information

Contact Us

Staff Title Departments Phone Email
Belmont, Ranee Deputy Court Clerk Justice Court (801) 852-6878
Davis, Adriene Lead Deputy Court Clerk Justice Court (801) 852-6878
Flores, Lourdes Deputy Court Clerk Justice Court (801) 852-6878
Hansen, Shaun Deputy Court Clerk Justice Court (801) 852-6878
Hargis, Jodi Traffic Clerk Justice Court (801) 852-6878
Jensen, Yolanda Lead Deputy Court Clerk Justice Court (801) 852-6878
Newton, ReAnnun Court Administrator Justice Court (801) 852-6878
Romney, Vernon F Justice Court Judge Justice Court (801) 852-6878
Spratt, Bryan Deputy Court Clerk Justice Court (801) 852-6878
Stewart, Yolanda Deputy Court Clerk Justice Court (801) 852-6878
Christensen, Ashli Deputy Court Clerk Justice Court (801) 852-6878

How can I reschedule my court date?

To reschedule a criminal/traffic case you must come into the court by Noon the business day prior to your court date to sign a promise to appear. You are allowed only ONE continuance. 

To reschedule a small claims hearing you must come into the court FIVE business days prior to the hearing, to submit a Motion and Order to Postpone. 

How do I file a small claim?

Please refer to the following link:  Learn More>>

How do I file an expungement?

Before filing a Petition to Expunge Records, the petitioner must obtain a Certificate of Eligibility issued by the Bureau of Criminal Identification of the Utah Department of Public Safety. The petitioner applies to BCI for the certificate. There is a fee to apply for the certificate. It can take a substantial amount of time for BCI to issue the certificate.

Once the Certificate of Eligibility has been received you will need to fill out the required forms prior to filing them at the Court. You may obtain the forms from the Utah Court Website. The forms required are listed below:

  • Petition to Expunge Records (Choose specific sub-heading that applies to your case)
    • Charges never filed
    • Conviction
    • Drug Possession Conviction
    • Dismissal or Acquittal
    • Special Certificate from BCI
  • Acceptance of Service
  • Findings of Fact, Conclusions of Law and Order on Petition to Expunge Records (Choose specific sub-heading that applies to your case)
    • Charges never filed
    • Conviction
    • Drug Possession Conviction
    • Dismissal or Acquittal
    • Special Certificate from BCI

Before filing the forms and Certificate of Eligibility at the court you must deliver them to the Provo City Attorney's Office located at 351 W Center St. After the City Attorney has received them, you may file them at the court. The filing fee will be $135 and any certified copies will be $4 plus .50¢ per page. Please note once the forms are filed with the court it can take up to 60 days for your petition to be signed by the Judge.

How do I get a marriage license?

Contact the Utah County Clerk's office at 801-851-8108

How do I pay my ticket?

You may pay your ticket online, by phone, in person or it may be mailed. Learn More>>

How do I provide proof of insurance?

If you had valid insurance at the time of the citation, you must provide a letter from your insurance company or agent on the insurance letterhead. The letter must include current date, name of insured, vehicle description (must match vehicle on the citation), agent's signature, and citation or case number. Letter also must state coverage was in effect on the date and time the citation was issued with no lapse in coverage. Insurance cards and/or declarations page will not be accepted as valid proof. 

How do I resolve a fix-it citation?

Vehicle safety violations are the only types of charges eligible for a fix-it violation.  Registration and insurance violations are not considered fix-it violations by State law.

Fix-it tickets need to be signed off by a Public Safety Officer and turned into the court within 14 days of the violation to be eligible for dismissal.  

How do I resolve a registration citation?

If your vehicle was registered at the time of the citation you may be eligible for a dismissal.   You may also be eligible for a dismissal if your registration was less than 2 months past due at the time of the citation AND the registration has been brought current within 14 days of the violation.  Proof of current valid registration along with proof that the registration was paid needs to be provided to the court within 14 days of the violation to be eligible for dismissal.

 If you are not eligible for a dismissal under the terms above, you may be eligible for a $10 credit towards your fine with proof of registration.  You will need to provide proof to the court of your current registration for your credit and pay the remainder of the fine.

Inquiring about Divorce, Custody, Evictions or Felonies?

Please contact the Provo 4th District Court at 801-429-1000.

Service Provider List

Below are links to help you find a licensed provider for court ordered assessments, treatment and specific classes.  You are responsible to meet the deadlines ordered by the Judge.  After selecting a provider from one of the lists below, make sure to let them know of the time frames you were ordered to complete assessments, treatment and/or specific classes.

If you are a veteran you may qualify for free counseling at the Provo Veteran Center located at 1807 N 1120 W, Provo, Utah  (801)-377-1117

List of State Providers by City

List of State Providers by Name

 

Can I get legal advice from the Provo City Attorney's Office?

Provo City Attorneys provide legal advice only to the City's elected and appointed officials, not to individual citizens. Private legal matters must be handled by attorneys retained by the person seeking legal advice.

How do I change my court date?

If you have been charged with a class "B" or "C" misdemeanor, or you received a traffic citation in Provo City, you can contact the Provo City Justice Court to change your court date.

How do I make a "damage claim" against Provo City?

Any person who has been damaged by the City may make a claim for damages against the City.  Please visit our Litigation, Claims, Risk Management, and Safety Division page for more detailed information.

What happens when a zoning violation is reported to the City?

  • First, a zoning officer determines if a zoning violation exists.
  • If the zoning officer determines the property is not in compliance with City zoning ordinances, a notice of violation is sent to the property owner.  The notice includes a time frame to bring the property into compliance.
  • If the time frame elapses without compliance, the case is referred to the City’s Legal Department. 
  • The Legal Department issues a letter informing the property owner that the City intends to file criminal charges.
  • Most cases are resolved without the need to file a criminal action with the courts. 

How do I drive around a roundabout?

While you might normally think of these only being in Europe, the US and especially Provo have their fair share of roundabouts. Roundabouts are a way of managing intersections in a safer and more efficient way than four way stops or traffic signals. 

How do I get a Clear the Air pin?

If you pledge to:

  • Consolidate vehicle trips and reduce my family’s total
  • driving
  • Park and walk instead of using drive-up windows
  • Don’t let my vehicle idle more than 30 seconds, even on
  • cold mornings
  • Ride my bike, car-pool or use public transportation
  • No wood burning
  • Keep my sidewalks clear to help it easier for others to walkStop by the Mayor's Office 

Stop by the Mayor's Office to pick up your Clear the Air pin!

 

How do I get an exemption to the noise ordinance?

The city has a well established noise policy found in chapter 9.06 of our code book. The amount of noise that is acceptable is determined by the decibels produced. The ordinance does allow for exceptions for sounds created by parades, carnivals, special public social events, or special construction projects.

An exemption is granted by a permit from the Mayor. If you are interested in an exemption, please contact Tracy Orme in the Mayor's office at 801-852-6105 or torme@provo.org.

Each exemption is issued under the condition that it can be revoked. It is expected that during the event the applicant will work with police if complaints are filed to accommodate the reasonable needs of neighbors.

How do I get quality air/ no burn alerts?

 

You can subscribe to the Choose Clean Air Email Alerts.

AIR QUALITY ALERTS

This service will automatically send you an e-mail when air quality conditions move from green to yellow or red. You can subscribe or unsubscribe at any time here »

UTAH AIR APP

Download the UtahAir app on: Android | iOS

In addition, for current conditions and updates, residents, businesses and visitors can call 801-536-0072 or 1-800-228-5434.

 

How do I nominate myself or someone else to serve on a Provo City Board?

Nominate yourself or someone else to serve on a Provo City Board by filling out the online application located on each board's webpage. Learn more »

How do I sign up to receive City Emails?

Sign up to receive official Provo City news, events, and updates here »

How does 1 Gb compare to other common speeds?

The following table shows “common” speeds by connection type / technology in megabits per second (Mbps).

table3

How does 1Gb guarantee I will get the full use out of the connection?

There is no guarantee. Internet services use different kinds of links and the general rule states that you are only as fast as the slowest link. Historically the slowest link was that of the home internet link. With a 1Gb link it will be more likely that the site you are connecting to is the slower link. The good news is that you will be able to run as fast as the sites you are connecting to.

table4

 

How many parking spaces do you require building owners to provide?

This varies depending on several factors. The largest factor is the proximity to campus. Recent developments approved near campus have been required to provide 7 parking stalls for every 10 residents.

What about on-street parking and why are there parking permit programs in areas near BYU and off-campus student housing?

In Provo, parking on city streets is generally allowed. There are some cases where that parking is time limited. For example, on-street parking in downtown Provo during business hours is limited to two hours.

In addition, the area around BYU uses three parking permit programs. Some important restrictions include authorized vehicles only parking at certain times of the day and even no vehicle parking at all times. For specific information about where these areas are and what the restrictions are visit the parking permit program page*.

*Please note that the Municipal Council has removed the parking permit program in the North Joaquin area from the City Code.  At some point in the future, the Council may consider establishing a permit program in this area, but for the time being, none is planned.

Remember that drivers cannot park within 25 feet of any intersection or in front of fire hydrants and cannot block sidewalks or driveways.

Violators who are cited will need to pay their parking ticket or file an appeal with the Justice Court. Violators should read their citation carefully and follow the instructions – failing to respond to the citation within a few days can result in higher fines.

What do lagging left turn lights and flashing yellow arrows mean?

Usually, when a red light changes to green for all lanes, the left turn lane becomes a yield. A "lagging" left turn occurs after the through lanes have stopped and left turn lane changes to a protected(green arrow) turn. Lagging left turns free up traffic flow and makes it easier for you to turn. It also avoids trapping people in the middle of the intersection when all the lights turn red.  So the bottom line is that if you are waiting in line to make a left turn at a light and the light turns red, watch for a left arrow instead of waiting through the next signal phase; you might get to go sooner than you think!

Another thing you might notice as being a little different in Utah County are the flashing yellow arrows facing the left turn lanes at major intersections.  The flashing yellow arrow does NOT mean that you should speed through the intersection before the arrow turns red. Instead, you should yield to oncoming traffic while watching the turn arrow.  If the turn arrow turns from flashing to solid yellow; you should proceed to turn left when the path is clear, but before the arrow turns red. 

What does 1Gb actually correspond to in real life usage? For example, how many web pages, emails or videos is this?

It’s hard to give exact figures – for example every web page differs in size depending on the amount of text, images and other multimedia content within it. Also, whilst most e-mail messages are small in size, they can also be fairly large if they include attachments such as photos. In the following table, we’ve taken “typical” usage and provided a number of “What (how many X) can be done (downloaded) in approximately 1 second.”

table1

What is the difference between GB and Gb?

In the computer world it is “common” practice to use a large B = Bytes while the small b = bits. It takes 8 bits to equal a byte. This means that 1 GB = 8 Gb.

table2

What is the project?

The Utah Transit Authority (UTA) and the Utah Department of Transportation (UDOT) are proposing to build a bus rapid transit (BRT) system through Provo and Orem.  The Provo-Orem BRT is a multimodal project that addresses transit as well as roadway infrastructure needs.  The preferred alternative, as defined through the environmental assessment process, completed in 2011, connects the Orem Intermodal Center, Utah Valley University, the University Mall area, Brigham Young University, high density student housing areas, downtown Provo, the Provo Intermodal Center, the Provo Towne Centre Mall and the East Bay Business Park.  The buses will travel about half of the route in dedicated lanes with signal prioritization.

When they say 1 GB do they always mean one gigabyte?


Unfortunately no. Some groups (e.g. marketing companies) forget or get mixed up that there is a technical difference between 1GB and 1Gb. As such it is sometimes the case that a statement of 1GB NETWORK actually means one gigabit (1Gb looks funny in titles etc. so they change it to look “pretty”).

NOTE: Network connections are generally listed as BITS per second while file sizes are listed in BYTES. How does this relate to real life? A 1 GB (Gigabyte) file will take at least 8 seconds to download on a 1 Gb (Gigabit) connection (there are other aspects to networking that increase the time here however, to keep things “simple”, we have left the complexities of networking out of this comment).

 

 


Who can actually read 125,000 emails or 1,250 web pages each second? Isn’t this overkill?


There was a time when individuals thought 64Kb of RAM was more than could ever be used. Within a few years those limits were far from sufficient. Although it is not realistic for a single individual to read 125,000 emails each second, we must be ready to handle the next generation of service development. After all, we ARE on the cusp of green fields development that promises to deliver super high definition video, audio, and data for both business and home usage. Unfortunately the widely available “broadband” service speeds of today are not enough to handle these next generation technologies.

NOTE: While 1Gb takes care of us for our understood near future needs we should not be surprised when 10Gb, 100Gb, and even 1Tb connections become the mainstay connection speeds of the future. Enjoy the ride!

table5


Why are some of the gutters in Provo really deep?

Watch out for those unusually deep gutters in the area around the south end of BYU campus. These deep gutters used to function as irrigation ditches, but they can eat your car’s tires if you aren't careful. 

Why does the City of Provo allow such high fees for booting and towing?

The City of Provo itself does not boot or tow except in extreme circumstances. However, the practice is common among some property owners. Provo is able to regulate these practices on private property only to a small degree.

In Provo, the general principle is that government should not unduly intrude into how private property owners choose to use their properties. The prevailing philosophy is that the agreement between a driver who wants to park and the property owner who has a parking stall is a private agreement that should be entered into knowingly by both parties and that the private property owner sets the terms. Accordingly, the city ordinances that govern parking on private property are mainly structured around giving drivers “fair notice” of parking restrictions existing on privately owned property. For example, if a private property owner wants to control parking on his property, he must post a sign at the entrances of the property letting drivers know that parking is restricted and letting them know that they might be towed or immobilized (“booted”) if they park there. The city ordinance also regulates towing company operators in some ways to protect the interests of drivers. In addition, the ordinance requires landlords to include any provisions about parking on their property by tenants so that the provisions are fully disclosed in rental agreements. The city code related to towing company operations and fair notice can be found in Section 9.32.140.

Utah State law regulates how much can be charged by towing operators, but the limits are quite high. You can learn more about these regulations or file a complaint about a towing operator at the State's towing code.

The Mayor is also working on finding some solutions to the booting and towing situation. On December 17, 2013, the Mayor worked with the Municipal Council to pass an ordinance that would place booting and towing back into the hands of the owner. In 2005, the ordinance was changed to allow for a tow to be initiated by a towing company without the specific consent of the property owner.  This has created a situation to allow predatory towing. With the change of the ordinance, the owners will be responsible to call to have a car booted or towed. Now, tow companies are no longer allowed to tow and boot out of their own volition. However, owners may sign a contract with approved tow companies for those services.

Be cautious about where you park! Pay attention to the signage at parking lot entrances and avoid parking where parking in restricted areas. If you feel you are a victim of unfair booting or towing, the best course of action is to discuss it with the owner of the property where the parking spot is located.

Do you have guns to rent at the Shooting Sports Park?

You must bring your own fire arms. Only rim-fire, center-fire or muzzle loading rifles and handguns are authorized on the ranges.

How do I buy a Shooting Sports Park punch pass?

Punch pass cards may be purchased at the Parks Office at 1417 S 350 E, Monday-Thursday, 7:00AM-6:00PM

How do I learn more about Provo's Parks?

We have two excellent resources to learn more about the amenities offered at our parks. Our Park Finder site is a great way to filter certain amenities or the Parks Info page will give you each park's specifications and pavilion capacities.

 

How do I make a Park Pavilion reservation?

Park Pavilion reservations are open January 1 of each year to accommodate the reservation season each year (April 15 - October 15). Reservations can be made online by clicking here or with Provo 311 by calling 311 or (801)852-6000.

How do I volunteer for the Shooting Sports Park?

If you are interested in volunteering as a Range Safety Officer (RSO) at the Shooting Sports Park, please fill out the RSO Volunteer Application and email it to Wayne Tanaka, Range Safety Officer Supervisor, or call (801)-852-6646 for more information.

How do I volunteer with Parks and Grounds?

Provo Parks and Grounds work with individuals and groups on volunteer projects year round. In 2016, we had 4,452 volunteers who donated 12,412 hours! To learn more about volunteering program, please visit the Volunteer In Provo page or click here to email our volunteer coordinator.

What are the pay/benefits like?

Payment for police officers begins at $21.35/hour on a progressive career series pay scale, with regular pay advancements. Contact Human Resources for additional information regarding benefits.

As a parent, what should I be doing?

Parents are encouraged to join their child on the first day of class at their ‘level’ sign to meet the instructor. Parents are encouraged to sit in the stands and watch. Please do not sit on the player’s benches. If you have questions, please approach instructors after class.

Do I have to register with USA Hockey?

All skaters are required to register with USA Hockey in order to participate in the Mini Mites program. To register, visit usahockeyregistration.com.

cost: 
6 and under -> free
7 and older -> $40

Do I need to know how to skate?

Basic skating skills are required for participation in the Mini Mites program. Skaters must be able to pass Hockey level 3 of the Learn to Skate program.

How do I find a team manager?

Team managers are players within our league and oftentimes you can make these connections at drop in’s.  Drop in players can introduce you to their team mangers.  You can also contact the League Coordinator, Foster Watabe by email and he can provide you with contacts of people who have managed teams in the past who are possibly coming back for the current season.  The league coordinator can also help fill teams or know of teams who might need extra players. 

For more information, contact Foster at fwatabe@provo.org.

How do I join the Peaks Adult Hockey League?

There are two basic ways to sign up for the league.

  1. Sign up as a team.  The most common way to sign up is under a team manager.  The team manager is responsible for collecting payment from the players on the team and filling a roster with players.  Pay collection, the division of player fees, and matching jerseys are the responsibility of the team manager.
  2. You can sign up as an individual.  If we have 12 or more individuals sign up in any one division, then we create a team of individuals.  If there are less than 12 players than we refund you the money paid and you will have to find room on an existing team.  The individual team is managed by the league coordinator, and team jerseys are provided by the Peaks Ice Arena.

May I skate with my child?

Parents may skate with their children during practice time -- the last 15 minutes of class.

May I skate with my child?

Parents may skate with their children during practice time -- the last 15 minutes of class.

Mini Mites and the Peaks Polar Bears

The Mini Mites hockey program is designed to provide aspiring hockey players with experience and prepare them for participation with the Peaks Polar Bears.

What equipment is required?

Basic hockey equipment is required for participation in the Mini Mites program.
- hockey skates, helmet w/mask, shin pads, elbow pads
Equipment rental is available with a $20 refundable deposit.

What league should I be in?

  1. A Division (Advanced) – designed to be the advanced division of play.  This will include players who may have once played at a high level (former pros, college and junior players, college club, midgets, and travel, etc.), and have mastered the speed and skill of the game, and feel confident playing at this level.
  2. B Division (Intermediate) – designed to be the intermediate division of play. This will include players who may have once played at an intermediate skill level (high school, youth league, some travel [bantam and below]), and feel confident with the speed and skill required to play the game at this level.
  3. C  Division (Rookie) – designed more for the beginning level player (5 years or less playing experience) or those players who have not played the game for a while and are looking to get back into the competitive playing experience.  Generally, these players have not played on a travel team, at the college level, at the junior/midget level, or any professional hockey in the past.

What time should I arrive?

Allow at least 10 minutes prior to class to get skates on.

What time should I arrive?

Allow at least 10 minutes prior to class to get skates on.

When is it too late to join the league?

There is a policy and procedures guide that is online that explains when team roster freeze dates are.  If it is past that time then you will not be allowed on any team, regardless if they have room on the team for you or not.  If it is prior to the freeze date, then you can contact managers about joining a team.

Will I need a USA hockey membership to play?

Yes, USA hockey membership is a fee separate from the Provo Peaks Ice Arena’s registration fee and must be obtained before you can begin participation in our league.  As a sanctioned USA hockey affiliation, we require you to be a member of USA Hockey for participation in our league.  You will need to provide proof of this, on or before the first game of the season.

Bike Registration

The bicycle will have a stamped manufacturer's serial number on the frame (usually on underside of the bike frame). If this number has been obliterated or does not exist, the Provo Police have a metal stamp kit and can stamp a number on the bike.

A Bike Registration Form is available in .pdf file format. Download the application, provide the information requested, and return it to:
Provo Licensing and Treasurer’s Office
351 W Center Street
Provo, UT 84601

Provide the information and $1.00 in person to the Provo License Clerk. Your license will be issued at the time of payment. The license is valid through the life of the bike with the same owner. If the bicycle is sold and given to someone else, that person can call into the Police Records Office to have the information update at (801) 852-6232.

Complaints/Commendations

If you are considering filing a commendation or complaint, have questions or would like additional information, please contact Lt. Jeff Lougee (801) 852-7260. Forms and instructions for filing complaints or commendations may be downloaded from this website or mailed upon request by calling our office.

Does the Provo Police Department sponsor applicants at the Police Academy?

Provo City will hire certified candidates and will sponsor non-certified candidates through the Utah Police Officer Standards and Training (POST) Academy upon hire.

Fingerprinting

Fingerprinting is available through our customer service department from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM on Mondays through Fridays. 

DRIVING PRIVILEGE CARD FINGERPRINTS:
Fingerprints and photos for the Driving Privilege Cards are not done by Provo Police Department. You will need to contact the Bureau of Criminal Identification, 3888 W 5400 S, Salt Lake City, UT 84129, 801 965 4445. Please see the Driver License Division's website for more information and instructions.

How Do I Request a Police Report?

Request police report / GRAMA requests

In order to obtain a copy of a report, you must be the subject of the record or the legal guardian of a minor listed on the record. Generally, copies of police reports are not able to be released until after they have been adjudicated, or processed through court. If you are the defendant on a case that is not adjudicated and are currently not represented by an attorney in the matter, you can obtain a copy through Discovery at the Prosecuting Attorney’s Office. If you are represented by an attorney, your attorney will need to request the report. If you are listed as a victim of domestic violence on the report you are seeking, the case will be provided to you immediately, at no charge. If you are trying to get the report on behalf of another individual, you must have a signed and notarized Third Party Release Form.

The law provides 10 working days for us to process your request (5 days if you can show that you must have an expedited response). When you make a request, you will be required to fill out a GRAMA Request Form. If a copy of the recording of the dispatch call is also requested, please also fill out a Dispatch Recording Request Form. Please also provide the following information:
  • Photo Identification
  • Date(s) of Incident(s) Requested
  • Description of record(s) and reason for request (be specific, listing any and all documents needed)
  • Case Number (if available)

Please make sure you are as specific as possible as to what information you are requesting
and why you need this. You may request more than one record on the form. The GRAMA
request form may be turned into the Records Division personally or you may fax in this
request. The fax number for Records is (801) 377-7315. Please also include a legible copy of
your identification with the form.

Fees:

The fees associated with the release of records are $15.00 per report (or $15.00 per research hour on records that are extensive) and $20.00 for copies of Dispatch tapes. The fees are due at the time the record(s) are requested. If you desire that your records be faxed, arrangements for the payment of fees will need to be made before the records are sent, and there is an additional fee of $.25 per page for faxing.

How Do I Request a Traffic Accident?

In order to obtain a copy of a traffic accident, you must have either been involved in the accident or be the insurance company representing one of those involved. You will need to provide the following:
  • Identification
  • Date of Accident
  • Other Driver (if known)
  • Traffic Accident # (if Insurance Company Request)
Fees:
$10.00 fee for traffic accident report
$5.00 per page for digital photos ($25.00 if standard photos)

Online Purchases:
You may also purchase a copy of your traffic accident at CrashDocs.org. Once there you will need to know your last name, date of accident, and the traffic accident report number You will be charged a $10.00 fee for the traffic accident report and a $5.00 convenience fee If photos are available, you will be charged an additional $5.00 for these if requested You will then be able to download a .pdf copy of your accident report. 

What are the educational requirements?

Applicants are required to have a high school diploma or GED.

What are the physical fitness requirements?

You can view the physical fitness requirements here.

What are the prerequisites?

Prerequisites include the following:

  • 21 years of age at time of testing 
  • High school diploma (GED)
  • Driver’s license
  • US Citizenship or in active process of becoming a citizen.

Note: Provo City will sponsor non-certified candidates through the Utah POST Academy upon hire.

What happens after the hiring process is complete?

The Provo Police Department hires applicants who are certified by Utah Police Officer Standards and Training (POST), and we may sponsor non-certified candidates through the Utah POST Academy upon hire. After Academy certification, officers complete both an extensive in-house and field training programs.

What if I have a criminal history?

By Utah law, a felony conviction will disqualify you from being accepted into any law enforcement training academy or from being employed in a sworn police officer position. Other criminal involvement may also be disqualifying. For more information, visit https://post.utah.gov/prospective-officers/qualifications.

What is the testing procedure?

Initial testing includes:

  •  a written exam (Utah NPOST)
  •  physical fitness test
  • oral board interview
  • these tests produce an eligibility list of qualified candidates

Testing for qualified candidates includes: 

  • Chief’s interview and conditional offer of employment
  • Psychological screening
  • Polygraph screening
  • Basic physical exam
  • Background investigation

Candidates remain on the list for two (2) years. A candidate may remove their name from the list and resubmit; however, no individual will be allowed to test more often than once a year.

When are you hiring?

Hiring is based on eligibility list compiled after police officer testing, which occurs on a quarterly basis, and applications are accepted year-round. Candidates remain on the eligibility list for up to two (2) years after testing. Sign up for testing today, and we will notify you of our next test date.

When will I get a conditional offer?

A conditional offer of employment may be given following successful completion of police officer testing and interviews.

Will I undergo a background check or other criteria?

The Police Department conducts an extensive background check on every applicant after a conditional offer of employment is made. Background checks involve a review of criminal history, moral character, physical and mental health concerns, and other qualifications. Candidates will be required to complete a polygraph test, psychological evaluation, and basic physical exam. For more information, visit https://post.utah.gov/prospective-officers/legal-requirements

How do I drive around a roundabout?

While you might normally think of these only being in Europe, the US and especially Provo have their fair share of roundabouts. Roundabouts are a way of managing intersections in a safer and more efficient way than four way stops or traffic signals. 

How many parking spaces do you require building owners to provide?

This varies depending on several factors. The largest factor is the proximity to campus. Recent developments approved near campus have been required to provide 7 parking stalls for every 10 residents.

What about on-street parking and why are there parking permit programs in areas near BYU and off-campus student housing?

In Provo, parking on city streets is generally allowed. There are some cases where that parking is time limited. For example, on-street parking in downtown Provo during business hours is limited to two hours.

In addition, the area around BYU uses three parking permit programs. Some important restrictions include authorized vehicles only parking at certain times of the day and even no vehicle parking at all times. For specific information about where these areas are and what the restrictions are visit the parking permit program page*.

*Please note that the Municipal Council has removed the parking permit program in the North Joaquin area from the City Code.  At some point in the future, the Council may consider establishing a permit program in this area, but for the time being, none is planned.

Remember that drivers cannot park within 25 feet of any intersection or in front of fire hydrants and cannot block sidewalks or driveways.

Violators who are cited will need to pay their parking ticket or file an appeal with the Justice Court. Violators should read their citation carefully and follow the instructions – failing to respond to the citation within a few days can result in higher fines.

What do lagging left turn lights and flashing yellow arrows mean?

Usually, when a red light changes to green for all lanes, the left turn lane becomes a yield. A "lagging" left turn occurs after the through lanes have stopped and left turn lane changes to a protected(green arrow) turn. Lagging left turns free up traffic flow and makes it easier for you to turn. It also avoids trapping people in the middle of the intersection when all the lights turn red.  So the bottom line is that if you are waiting in line to make a left turn at a light and the light turns red, watch for a left arrow instead of waiting through the next signal phase; you might get to go sooner than you think!

Another thing you might notice as being a little different in Utah County are the flashing yellow arrows facing the left turn lanes at major intersections.  The flashing yellow arrow does NOT mean that you should speed through the intersection before the arrow turns red. Instead, you should yield to oncoming traffic while watching the turn arrow.  If the turn arrow turns from flashing to solid yellow; you should proceed to turn left when the path is clear, but before the arrow turns red. 

Why are some of the gutters in Provo really deep?

Watch out for those unusually deep gutters in the area around the south end of BYU campus. These deep gutters used to function as irrigation ditches, but they can eat your car’s tires if you aren't careful. 

Why does the City of Provo allow such high fees for booting and towing?

The City of Provo itself does not boot or tow except in extreme circumstances. However, the practice is common among some property owners. Provo is able to regulate these practices on private property only to a small degree.

In Provo, the general principle is that government should not unduly intrude into how private property owners choose to use their properties. The prevailing philosophy is that the agreement between a driver who wants to park and the property owner who has a parking stall is a private agreement that should be entered into knowingly by both parties and that the private property owner sets the terms. Accordingly, the city ordinances that govern parking on private property are mainly structured around giving drivers “fair notice” of parking restrictions existing on privately owned property. For example, if a private property owner wants to control parking on his property, he must post a sign at the entrances of the property letting drivers know that parking is restricted and letting them know that they might be towed or immobilized (“booted”) if they park there. The city ordinance also regulates towing company operators in some ways to protect the interests of drivers. In addition, the ordinance requires landlords to include any provisions about parking on their property by tenants so that the provisions are fully disclosed in rental agreements. The city code related to towing company operations and fair notice can be found in Section 9.32.140.

Utah State law regulates how much can be charged by towing operators, but the limits are quite high. You can learn more about these regulations or file a complaint about a towing operator at the State's towing code.

The Mayor is also working on finding some solutions to the booting and towing situation. On December 17, 2013, the Mayor worked with the Municipal Council to pass an ordinance that would place booting and towing back into the hands of the owner. In 2005, the ordinance was changed to allow for a tow to be initiated by a towing company without the specific consent of the property owner.  This has created a situation to allow predatory towing. With the change of the ordinance, the owners will be responsible to call to have a car booted or towed. Now, tow companies are no longer allowed to tow and boot out of their own volition. However, owners may sign a contract with approved tow companies for those services.

Be cautious about where you park! Pay attention to the signage at parking lot entrances and avoid parking where parking in restricted areas. If you feel you are a victim of unfair booting or towing, the best course of action is to discuss it with the owner of the property where the parking spot is located.

Are there places that I can drop off recyclable material for free?

Yes, currently there are three locations in Provo that have large blue bins for residents to drop off their recyclable material for free. These locations are at:
  - Compost Station, 1625 South Industrial Parkway (blue recycling included)
  - Kiwanis Park, 820 N 1100 E
  - Fort Utah Park, 200 N Geneva Rd
 

Can I securely dispose of important documents?

Shred anything with confidential information. Rather than dumping loose shredded paper, tie it up in a clear bag and place in into a blue recycling can. It will be easily identified at the processing facility and put in the paper bin for recycling with similar materials.

Do I need to sort and organize all my recyclables?

No. All accepted recyclable materials can be thrown in its respective can without sorting them.

How big are the garbage containers I get from the city?

The black, blue and green containers are roughly the same size, about 95 gallons. The blue containers are provided and serviced by Republic Services so they may look a little different.

How can I make sure my cans are picked up?

Make sure your cans are out on the side of the street by 6:00AM on your scheduled collection day. There should be 10 feet above and 3 feet around the cans to allow clearance for the grabber arm. Failure to do so could cause damage to your property. Please have them away from parked cars and make sure the lids are closed and never overfill your cans.

How do I sign up for garbage, recycling or yard waste recycling with Provo City?

If you are new to Provo, residential garbage collection is included with your basic city services. At the time you sign up for service, you will be given the option to participate in recycling. Simply tell the Customer Service rep what services you want. If you opt out of recycling at that time, you can always sign up later by calling Customer Service at 311 or (801) 852-6000 and let them know what service you want to add. However many cans you need, whether it be green, blue or additional black containers, just let us know and we will be happy to assist you.

How much does garbage collection and recycling cost?

A table of rates can be found here.

I have a special project. Can I rent a dumpster from the city?

Yes, Provo City rents out 20-cubic-yard roll-off dumpsters for different projects. Please call 311 or (801) 852-6000 for details and availability. The city does have special events for different waste types, so watch for announcements throughout the year.

What can I recycle?

Provo City offers both green and blue recycling cans for city residents to recycle products. The blue cans are used for all plastics #1-7, paper products (newspaper, junk mail, books, magazines, etc) cardboard, milk/juice cartons, metal food and drink cans (without food residue). These are serviced by Provo City on the same day as regular garbage pickup.

The green cans are used for leaves, grass clippings, weeds, tree trimmings/twigs that will fit, egg shells, fruits & veggies, and other non-fatty food waste. If you would like to bag your green waste, please use paper bags, as plastic bags are not accepted in green cans.


What can't I put in green yard waste cans?

You can’t put garbage or recyclable blue can waste in green yard waste cans. Rocks, concrete, sod, big stumps, plastic bags, or chemically treated wood products are also not accepted. A fine may occur if garbage is found in the green cans. If all your green waste can’t fit, you can bring it to the city’s compost station for a charge of $5 per load for Provo residents. Only Provo residents can drop off loads from their yards - no landscape contractors.   Remember – the lid should be able to close. No tall loads that extend beyond the top or sides of the can.

What can't I put in the blue recycling cans?

You can’t put yard waste or regular garbage in the blue cans. Other unacceptable materials include styrofoam, glass, aluminum foil and anything with food scraps. Plastic grocery bags can be taken back to grocery stores and put in their bag recycling bins. They are not accepted in the blue cans. A fine may occur if garbage is found in blue cans.

What do I do with wastes that you don't accept?

South Utah Valley Solid Waste District has a fantastic list at suvswd.org that says where to take special waste that either the city doesn’t accept or may be illegal to put in landfills. Rates vary by location. The city also has special collection days throughout the year for specific wastes (Christmas trees in January, leaf bags in the fall, and a county-wide household & e-waste day in the spring). Please watch announcements for the special events.

What if I have more garbage than what my can will hold?

Additional cans may be requested by calling Customer Service at 311 or (801) 852-6000. It is less expensive to add two recycling cans (green & blue) than it is to have two black cans. Much of what you throw away can be recycled. If you have a need for additional black cans, though, Provo is more than happy to supply them to you. Remember…with the exception of Christmas trees and leaf bags, everything Provo City picks up must be inside the automated garbage cans.

What is the compost station?

The compost station, located at 1625 S Industrial Parkway, in south Provo is where all the green waste from the city is taken so it doesn’t fill up landfill space. This yard waste is then ground up and processed into compost. After the composting process is complete, it is then sold to the public ($3 per yard for Provo residents, $6 per yard for non-residents). It can be applied to soils to add valuable organic matter, while improving its texture and appearance.

For purchase information, call Provo City Customer Service at  3-1-1 or (801) 852-6000.

Provo residents can take secured loads of green waste to drop off at the compost station for a charge of $5. Provo residents only - no businesses and/or landscapers.

When is my garbage and recycling picked up?

Look at this city map and enter your home address to find which day garbage is collected at your home. Black and blue cans are picked up every week, while green cans are picked up every week March - November. Green cans are serviced from March – November when yard waste is accumulated. Make sure cans are out by 6:00AM on pickup day to avoid being missed. Please remove cans from city streets within 24 hours after cans have been emptied.

Where Can I Recycle Glass?

There is a glass recycling drop off bin at the south west corner of the Covey Center parking lot at 100 S 500 W. There are separate sections for different colors of glass.

Why does Provo City provide recycling service?

Provo does its part to be environmentally responsible, and recycling is a great way to do that. Using the specialty colored cans for yard waste and recyclables puts less waste in our landfills. This will substantially increase the lifetime of our landfills and it creates new products at a fraction of the cost of using only raw materials. Living environmentally conscious has never been so easy.

Why isn't there a recycling program for apartments?

Check out this link from the mayor’s office: provomayor.com/2011/06/08. The trucks that Provo City uses for curbside container collection are only able to pick up the 95 gallon cans along city streets. We are unable to pick up the large containers used by many businesses and apartment buildings. These establishments will usually contract out their garbage service with a private company that has the proper equipment and trucks.

Activity Guide

View our current Activity Guide

Do I have to register with USA Hockey?

All skaters are required to register with USA Hockey in order to participate in the Mini Mites program. To register, visit usahockeyregistration.com.

cost: 
6 and under -> free
7 and older -> $40

Do I need to know how to skate?

Basic skating skills are required for participation in the Mini Mites program. Skaters must be able to pass Hockey level 3 of the Learn to Skate program.

How do I find a team manager?

Team managers are players within our league and oftentimes you can make these connections at drop in’s.  Drop in players can introduce you to their team mangers.  You can also contact the League Coordinator, Foster Watabe by email and he can provide you with contacts of people who have managed teams in the past who are possibly coming back for the current season.  The league coordinator can also help fill teams or know of teams who might need extra players. 

For more information, contact Foster at fwatabe@provo.org.

How do I join the Peaks Adult Hockey League?

There are two basic ways to sign up for the league.

  1. Sign up as a team.  The most common way to sign up is under a team manager.  The team manager is responsible for collecting payment from the players on the team and filling a roster with players.  Pay collection, the division of player fees, and matching jerseys are the responsibility of the team manager.
  2. You can sign up as an individual.  If we have 12 or more individuals sign up in any one division, then we create a team of individuals.  If there are less than 12 players than we refund you the money paid and you will have to find room on an existing team.  The individual team is managed by the league coordinator, and team jerseys are provided by the Peaks Ice Arena.

How do I learn more about Provo's Parks?

We have two excellent resources to learn more about the amenities offered at our parks. Our Park Finder site is a great way to filter certain amenities or the Parks Info page will give you each park's specifications and pavilion capacities.

 

How do I make a Park Pavilion reservation?

Park Pavilion reservations are open January 1 of each year to accommodate the reservation season each year (April 15 - October 15). Reservations can be made online by clicking here or with Provo 311 by calling 311 or (801)852-6000.

How do I volunteer with Parks and Grounds?

Provo Parks and Grounds work with individuals and groups on volunteer projects year round. In 2016, we had 4,452 volunteers who donated 12,412 hours! To learn more about volunteering program, please visit the Volunteer In Provo page or click here to email our volunteer coordinator.

Lap Lane Availability

Matching Request

Participants may request one friend, and that friend must request your son/daughter for the request to be granted. No other requests are granted. (i.e. coaches, game times)

Mini Mites and the Peaks Polar Bears

The Mini Mites hockey program is designed to provide aspiring hockey players with experience and prepare them for participation with the Peaks Polar Bears.

RULES Minor League Boys Coach Pitch

Minor League Boys Coach Pitch

[ 2016 Rules ]

GENERAL

  1. Participants are currently in K-2nd Grades..
  2. Coaches are encouraged to hold a weekly practice for no longer than 1 hour.
  3. Coaches are responsible for warming up their team prior to game time.
  4. The first day will consist of batting practice for both teams and a shortened game.
  5. Games will be 55 minutes long. No new innings will begin after 50 minutes.

FIRST DAY SKILLS CLINIC

  1. Each team will have the opportunity to bat through their line - up with the coach pitching at the start of the first game (3 balls per child).
  2. While one team is batting, the other team will review fielding skills in the outfield.
  3. Once both teams have batted,, a shortened game will begin.

 

PRE-INNING WARM - UPS

  1. Pre-inning warm - ups for the fielding team will be led by the umpire between each inning (one warm - up ball per fielder).

 

BATTING

  1. Each batter receives a maximum of six pitches from the ir coach (enough for a full count). Umpires will be calling balls/strikes from the home plate.
  2. Players who receive 4 ‘balls’ from the pitcher will walk to 1 st base; 3 ‘strikes’ will consist of a strike out. Swinging attempts at a ‘ball’ will not count as a strike.
  3. If a fair ball is not hit from strike zone pitches, the batter i s out.
  4. Players are required to have their coach pitch; no tees or pitching machines will be provided.
  5. Coaches pitch from the drop down pitching rubber or 20 feet from home plate.
  6. Any ball accidentally hitting the umpire or machine is live and playable.
  7. Any runner intentionally interfering with a play will be called out.
  8. Batters must drop the bat after swinging. Any thrown bat,, as deemed by the umpire, will result in the batter being called out with no advancement of runners.
  9. Batter must make contact with the ball while in the batter's box, or batter is out.
  10. All players bat each inning. There will be no 3 out rule to end an inning, but players called out must return to the dugout area.
  11. Batters and catchers must wear helmets, even while running the bases.

 

DEAD BALL

  1. Any ball not hit into fair grass area or less than 10 feet, or hit in foul territory.
  2. When ball is returned to pitcher/umpire.
  3. All dead balls will be called by the umpire.

 

FIELDING

  1. Fielding team will consist of all players on the team. Only six (6) players may be on the infield, the rest of the players must be in the outfield.
  2. Catcher must retrieve balls intended for him /her, and return them to the pitcher/umpire after the ball is dead. Ideally, all the missed balls will be returned to the umpire after each batter.
  3. Pitcher must stand near the coach until the ball is hit.
  4. Please rotate all players through all positions, especially pitcher and 1st baseman.

 

BASE - STEALING

  1. No stealing. Runners must stay on base until the ball is hit. One base may be taken on an overthrow.

 

UNIFORMS

  1. Team shirts and hats are provided by the Recreation Department and must be worn at all games. Closed - toe shoes must be worn. Shorts are allowed.

 

PHILOSOPHY

The intention of Minor League Coach Pitch Baseball is to stress a fun and active experience, skill development, and learning atmosphere. Have fun and make learning the game of baseball a great experience for the players and all that are involved!

What are the refund policies?

For programs, full refunds will be given until the first day of class. After that, no refunds given.

What are the refund policies?

Youth Sports: No refunds after the first game.

Adult Sports: Full refunds will be given until the day before the coaches meeting. After that, no refunds will be given. 

What are the upcoming tours?

Twice a month we take 60+ patrons on a chartered bus for an adventure. Tours are typically 4-8 hour trips to local destinations and seasonal events. Spots fill up fast, so register today. Tours are non-refundable unless requested at least 72 hours in advance.

What equipment is required?

Basic hockey equipment is required for participation in the Mini Mites program.
- hockey skates, helmet w/mask, shin pads, elbow pads
Equipment rental is available with a $20 refundable deposit.

What is the cost of a Senior Annual Pass?

As a Provo Resident, if you are 60+ you can get a reduced rate Senior Annual Pass to the community side of the Provo Recreation Center for $10/year. This pass gives you access to the Senior Wellness Room, Game Room, Computer Lab and Library, limited Track and Swim access, Educational Programs and Seminars. See the Community Counter for details and information or call (801) 852-6620.

What league should I be in?

  1. A Division (Advanced) – designed to be the advanced division of play.  This will include players who may have once played at a high level (former pros, college and junior players, college club, midgets, and travel, etc.), and have mastered the speed and skill of the game, and feel confident playing at this level.
  2. B Division (Intermediate) – designed to be the intermediate division of play. This will include players who may have once played at an intermediate skill level (high school, youth league, some travel [bantam and below]), and feel confident with the speed and skill required to play the game at this level.
  3. C  Division (Rookie) – designed more for the beginning level player (5 years or less playing experience) or those players who have not played the game for a while and are looking to get back into the competitive playing experience.  Generally, these players have not played on a travel team, at the college level, at the junior/midget level, or any professional hockey in the past.

What's on the menu?

Lunch is provided for seniors 60+ Monday – Friday at the Recreation center. To sign-up, please stop by the community desk or call (801) 852-6620. You must make your reservation at least 24 hours in advance.

Lunch Menu

When is it too late to join the league?

There is a policy and procedures guide that is online that explains when team roster freeze dates are.  If it is past that time then you will not be allowed on any team, regardless if they have room on the team for you or not.  If it is prior to the freeze date, then you can contact managers about joining a team.

Will I need a USA hockey membership to play?

Yes, USA hockey membership is a fee separate from the Provo Peaks Ice Arena’s registration fee and must be obtained before you can begin participation in our league.  As a sanctioned USA hockey affiliation, we require you to be a member of USA Hockey for participation in our league.  You will need to provide proof of this, on or before the first game of the season.

Activity Guide

View our current Activity Guide

Can I bring a guest with my membership?

Guests are welcome to come with you by purchasing a day pass. $5 for adults, $4 for youth or seniors. 

Can I rent spaces at the Rec Center?

Yes! See the document below for general information.
Rental Quicksheet

Can you change the tv station for me?

The televisions throughout the facility are kept on preset stations. We do not take personal requests for the channels to be changed.

Child Watch Facility Rules

  • Pacifiers must be attached to children
  • No outside toys or food
  • No biting, hitting, or bullying
  • Infants must be in carriers

Diapers

Please bring your child in fresh diapers. If your child has an accident or needs their diaper changed you will be paged.

Directions to the facility

320 W 500 N, Provo UT, 84601

From the freeway, take the Provo Center Street Exit 265 heading west. Continue west until the light at Center Street and 500 West. Turn left and head north until the light at 500 North. Turn right. Continue for 2 blocks, the building is on the left (north) side of the street. 

Link to Google Maps

Do you have a year round swim team or swim club?

The Utah Valley Rays Swim Team is a year-round club team that runs separately from the Recreation Center. Swim Team Minimum Requirement: Can swim 25 yards doing freestyle and backstroke and coach approval. Experience in Breaststroke and Butterfly is preferred. Proficiency in each stroke is not required. Coaches look for ability to endure 1 hour workouts and current space available in appropriate workout group. Ages 6-18 yrs. For fees, tryouts or any other information contact the Utah Valley Rays website at uvrays.org

Do you have drop-in Volleyball?

We have drop-in Volleyball on Friday from 6:00-10:00PM in one court and Saturdays from 5:00-10:00PM in two courts.

Saturdays from 5:00-6:00PM, drop in volleyball will be reserved for recreational, all-ages play. Families are invited to participate together and enjoy a non-scored, casual atmosphere.

The remainder of drop in volleyball time is reserved for patrons ages 16+ that are able to participate in a full volleyball game. Players should rotate in to each team or, if numbers dictate, teams should rotate in on a per-game basis.

Do you have rental equipment available?

Limited equipment is available to rent for racquetball, tennis, Pickleball, billiards, and table tennis. Equipment fee of $1-$2 charged for racquetball, tennis, and Pickleball racquets, as well as wallyball equipment. Game Room equipment and Pickleballs, racquetballs, basketballs, volleyballs, and wallyballs are free and require a form of ID as collateral. You are also welcome to bring your own equipment. Wallyball equipment is $2 and requires 24 hour notice for use. Locks are not provided in the locker room, but are available to purchase for $7.

Drop Off/Pick Up

Children at Child Watch must be picked up by the same person who drops them off. This individual must present a state issued ID or membership card for identification.

Fitness Area General Rules

To use the upstairs fitness mezzanine, we do require a closed-toe athletic shoe and workout attire. No gym bags are allowed in the free weight area to help keep the space clear from clutter. The age restriction for using the facilities available upstairs is 14 or older, for safety of both children and patrons.

Fitness Etiquette Guidelines

How many basketball courts are available for drop-in?

There are two courts available for members to utilize Monday - Saturday.  Adult and Youth basketball and volleyball leagues utilize two courts on Tuesday - Thursday from 6:00 - 10:00PM and one court on Monday & Friday from 6:00 - 10:00PM.  Upon completion of league play on Saturdays, there are four courts available for usage beginning at 3:00PM.

3 hoops will be lowered to 8ft from 4pm-6pm Monday - Friday.

Lap Lane Availability

Lockers

Patrons can either purchase a lock from the Recreation Center Front Counter, or bring a personal lock from home. Shank size should be 7mm or less. Lockers are day use only.

Membership Refund Policies

When purchasing a membership to the Provo Recreation Center, the purchaser receives a discount when joining for a set term. If that contract term is not honored through cancellation, a penalty will be incurred.

Memberships Paid In Advance
Refunds will be based on a set monthly fee. The monthly fee, multiplied by how many months have passed since purchase, will be subtracted from the amount paid.
Monthly Refund Fee Amounts
• Youth/Senior $30
• Adult/Senior Couple $40
• Adult Couple $50

• Family $60

Memberships on Monthly Payments
Notification must be given at least one week before the next scheduled payment is due. Notice of cancellation must be received at least one week prior to the payment due date, or that payment will be charged. A cancellation fee will be charged to cancel the monthly payment contract. The cancellation fee must be paid before membership will be canceled.
Cancellation Fee to End Membership
• Youth/Senior $40
• Adult/Senior Couple $50
• Adult Couple $80
• Family $90

Pagers

You will be assigned a facility pager for use by staff when a child needs assistance.

The pager must be on you at all times, except during pool use. Pagers should be worn or kept on the person. Water safe bags are available for pool use. Please notify Child Watch staff if you plan to use the pool.

You will be paged if any the following occurs while your child is in Child Watch: biting or hitting, excessive crying, accident/diapering, or sickness/injury.

If damage occurs to the pager you will be charged a $50 replacement fee.

Scout Groups

Scout Groups are permitted to use the pool during public hours for completing merit badge and swimming requirements. Pool space is limited thus troops must use the allotted area to complete their skills. Regular clean clothing is permitted to complete the swimming with clothes on requirement however they must be clean and removed immediately after the skill is complete. Regular admissions apply.

Sick Kids

Children with any of the following symptoms will not be allowed into Child Watch: high temperature, persistent cough, heavy nasal discharge, diarrhea, vomiting, eye secretions, or rashes.

If your child becomes ill during their stay at Child Watch you will be contacted so you may take care of him/her at home.

Swim Lesson/Program Refunds

Full refunds are given until the class starts. Once the class begins, no refunds given. 

Time Limit

At the conclusion of your child’s visit, the charge will be assessed by the hour. If a child is not picked up after 1 hour and 15 minutes, the price for the additional hour will be incurred.

Your children may stay at Child Watch for up to 2 hours every day. If a child is not picked up from the facility within 2 hours a dollar per minute fee will be assessed up to 15 minutes. Every effort will be made to contact you before police will be called to pickup your child.

What are the pool temperatures?

Competition Pool: 80 degrees
Leisure Pools: Program Pool, Lazy River, Activity Pool, Teen Pool, Water Slides 86 degrees
Spa: 104 degrees

What are the refund policies?

For programs, full refunds will be given until the first day of class. After that, no refunds given.

What can I use to prove dependents?

If you are purchasing a couple or family membership, you will need to prove dependency. Tax forms that list all family members are preferred. Medical cards or forms that list all family members, birth certificates or a marriage certificate is also accepted. A couple membership can only be purchased by two adults who file taxes together. A family membership is available to one or two adults filing taxes together and their dependent children, 21 or younger. Children older than 21 cannot be on a family membership.

What can I use to prove residency?

To get a membership at the Provo Resident rate, you will need to bring proof of current Provo residency. This can include a bill, rental agreement, pay stub or tax documents. A drivers license is not accepted.

What is included in a membership?

A Recreation Center Membership gives you full access to all amenities in the facility. Drop-In Fitness Classes are all included in your membership. Child Watch and Programs (swimming lessons, art classes, etc.) are an extra fee. Members can reserve racquetball and tennis courts up to a week in advance. Non-Members can reserve the day of. Membership gives you discounted access to events held throughout the year, such as the Halloween Carnival.

What is Silver Sneakers and how do I qualify?

Silver Sneakers is a health insurance program that covers the cost of your recreation center membership. You will need to check with your insurance provider to see if they offer Silver Sneakers. If you our a Silver Sneakers participant, you will need to bring your 16-digit member number with you to sign up. Silver Sneakers gives you full access to our facility.

What is the difference between a Senior Pass and a Senior Rec Center Membership?

The Senior Pass gives you access to the Community side of the building. This includes access to the Senior Wellness Room, Senior Library and Computer Lab, plus senior activities and programs. There is limited access at certain times of the day for track and pool use. A Senior Rec Center Membership gives you full access to the entire building. This includes Community access, but also full access to the track, pool and other rec center amenities.

What Pool Toys are Allowed?

What toys are patrons allowed to bring into the pool areas?

Allowed:
Small hand held toys
Small squirt guns
Noodles

Not Allowed:
Large toys
Large water guns
Motorized toys
Rafts/Blow up toys

This is not an exhaustive list. Aquatic staff will remove any toy or accessory they deem unsafe because of size or use. Please see a staff member for details.

I know there are lots of types of mortgages - how do I know which one is best for me?

You're right - there are many types of mortgages, and the more you know about them before you start, the better. Most people use a fixed-rate mortgage. In a fixed rate mortgage, your interest rate stays the same for the term of the mortgage, which normally is 30 years. The advantage of a fixed-rate mortgage is that you always know exactly how much your mortgage payment will be and you can plan for it. Another kind of mortgage is an Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM). With this kind of mortgage, your interest rate and monthly payments usually start lower than a fixed rate mortgage. But your rate and payment can change either up or down, as often as once or twice a year. The adjustment is tied to a financial index, such as the U.S. Treasury Securities index. The advantage of an ARM is that you may be able to afford a more expensive home because your initial interest rate will be lower. There are several government mortgage programs including the Veteran's Administration’s programs and the Department of Agriculture’s programs. Most people have heard of FHA mortgages. FHA doesn't actually make loans. Instead, it insures loans so that if buyers default for some reason, the lenders will get their money. This encourages lenders to give mortgages to people who might not otherwise qualify for a loan. Talk to your real estate broker about the various kinds of loans before you begin shopping for a mortgage.

I've heard of HUD homes. What are HUD homes, and are they a good deal?

HUD homes can be a very good deal. When someone with a HUD insured mortgage can't meet the payments, the lender forecloses on the home; HUD pays the lender what is owed; and HUD takes ownership of the home. Then it is sold at market value as quickly as possible. Read all about buying a HUD home - one might be right for you!

When I find the home I want, how much should I offer?

Again, your real estate broker can help you here. But there are several things you should consider: 1) is the asking price in line with prices of similar homes in the area? 2) Is the home in good condition or will you have to spend a substantial amount of money making it the way you want it? You probably want to get a professional home inspection before you make your offer. Your real estate broker can help you arrange one. 3) How long has the home been on the market? If it's been for sale for a while, the seller may be more eager to accept a lower offer. 4) How much mortgage will be required? Make sure you really can afford whatever offer you make. 5) How much do you really want the home? The closer you are to the asking price, the more likely your offer will be accepted. In some cases, you may even want to offer more than the asking price if you know you are competing with others for the house.

Why should I buy instead of rent?

You'll love the feeling of having something that's all yours - a home where your own personal style will tell the world who you are. A thriving vegetable garden in the backyard, a tiled entryway, a yellow kitchen...when you own, you can do it all your way! But there's more to owning a home than personal satisfaction. You can deduct the cost of your mortgage loan interest from your federal income taxes, and usually from your state taxes, too. And interest will compose nearly all of your monthly payment for over half the number of years you'll be paying your mortgage. This adds up to hefty savings at the end of each year. And you're also allowed to deduct the property taxes you pay as a homeowner. If you rent, you write your monthly check and it's gone forever. Another financial plus in owning a home is the possibility its value will go up through the years.

How do I find a lender?

You can finance a home with a loan from a bank, a savings and loan, a credit union, a private mortgage company, or various state government lenders. Shopping for a loan is like shopping for any other large purchase: you can save money if you take some time to look around for the best prices. Different lenders can offer quite different interest rates and loan fees; and as you know, a lower interest rate can make a big difference in how much home you can afford. Talk with several lenders before you decide. Most lenders need 3-6 weeks for the whole loan approval process. Your real estate broker will be familiar with lenders in the area and what they're offering. Or you can look in your local newspaper's real estate section - most papers list interest rates being offered by local lenders. You can find FHA-approved lenders in the Yellow Pages of your phone book. HUD does not make loans directly - you must use a HUD-approved lender if you're interested in an FHA loan.

How do I know if I can get a loan?

Use our simple mortgage calculators to see how much mortgage you could pay - that's a good start. If the amount you can afford is significantly less than the cost of homes that interest you, then you might want to wait awhile longer. But before you give up, why don't you contact a real estate broker or a HUD-funded housing counseling agency? They will help you evaluate your loan potential. A broker will know what kinds of mortgages the lenders are offering and can help you choose a lender with a program that might be right for you. Another good idea is to get pre-qualified for a loan. That means you go to a lender and apply for a mortgage before you actually start looking for a home. Then you'll know exactly how much you can afford to spend, and it will speed the process once you do find the home of your dreams.

How long does it take to process a loan application?

Our normal loan processing time is approximately one week to determine income eligibility and an average of 2-3 weeks to close.

How much can you qualify for?

The Home Purchase Plus loan is to provide down-payment and/or closing cost assistance of up to $10,000 based on need (determined by HUD formula) city wide.  You must be able to put down $1,000 of your own money.

Subject to RDA underwriting criteria.

How much money will I have to come up with to buy a home?

Well, that depends on a number of factors, including the cost of the house and the type of mortgage you get. In general, you need to come up with enough money to cover three costs: earnest money - the deposit you make on the home when you submit your offer to prove to the seller that you are serious about wanting to buy the house; the down payment, a percentage of the cost of the home that you must pay when you go to settlement; and closing costs, the costs associated with processing the paperwork to buy a house. 

When you make an offer on a home, your real estate broker will put your earnest money into an escrow account. If the offer is accepted, your earnest money will be applied to the down payment or closing costs. If your offer is not accepted, your money will be returned to you. The amount of your earnest money varies. If you buy a HUD home, for example, your deposit generally will range from $500 - $2,000. 

The more money you can put into your down payment, the lower your mortgage payments will be. Some types of loans require 10-20% of the purchase price. That's why many first-time homebuyers turn to HUD's FHA for help. FHA loans require only 3% down - and sometimes less. 

Closing costs—which you will pay at settlement—average 3-4% of the price of your home. These costs cover various fees your lender charges and other processing expenses. When you apply for your loan, your lender will give you an estimate of the closing costs, so you won't be caught by surprise. If you buy a HUD home, HUD may pay many of your closing costs.

I'm a single mother. How would I go about buying a home?

 Although you won't have the benefit of two incomes on which to qualify for a loan, there's no reason that you can't become a homeowner. Become familiar with the process, pick a good real estate broker and think about getting pre-qualified for a loan. You might want to contact one of the HUD-funded housing counseling agencies in your area to talk through your options. And you also might want to think about buying a HUD home - they can be very good deals. Also, contact your local government to see if there are any local home-buying programs that could help you. Look in the blue pages of your phone directory for your local office of housing and community development or, if you can't find it, contact your mayor's office or your county executive's office.

In addition to the mortgage payment, what other costs do I need to consider?

Well, of course you'll have your monthly utilities. If your utilities have been covered in your rent, this may be new for you. Your real estate broker will be able to help you get information from the seller on how much utilities normally cost. In addition, you might have homeowner association or condo association dues. You'll definitely have property taxes, and you also may have city or county taxes. Taxes normally are rolled into your mortgage payment. Again, your broker will be able to help you anticipate these costs.

I've had bad credit, and I don't have much for a down-payment. Can I become a home buyer?

You may be a good candidate for one of the federal mortgage programs that are available. A good place for you to start is by contacting one of the HUD-funded housing counseling agencies. They can help you sort through your options. In addition, contact your local government to see if there are any local home-buying programs that might work for you. Look in the blue pages of your phone directory for your local office of housing and community development or, if you can't find it, contact your mayor's office or your county executive's office.

Should I use a real estate broker? How do I find one?

Using a real estate broker is a very good idea. All the details involved in home buying, particularly the financial ones, can be mind-boggling. A good real estate professional can guide you through the entire process and make the experience much easier. A real estate broker will be well acquainted with all the important things you'll want to know about a neighborhood you may be considering...the quality of schools, the number of children in the area, the safety of the neighborhood, traffic volume and more. He or she will help you figure the price range you can afford and search the classified ads and multiple listing services for homes you'll want to see. With immediate access to homes as soon as they're put on the market, the broker can save you hours of wasted driving-around time. When it's time to make an offer on a home, the broker can point out ways to structure your deal to save you money. He or she will explain the advantages and disadvantages of different types of mortgages, guide you through the paperwork, and be there to hold your hand and answer last-minute questions when you sign the final papers at closing. And you don't have to pay the broker anything! The payment comes from the home seller - not from the buyer. 

By the way, if you want to buy a HUD home, you will be required to use a real estate broker to submit your bid. To find a broker who sells HUD homes, check your local yellow pages or the classified section of your local newspaper.

So what will happen at closing?

Basically, you'll sit at a table with your broker, the broker for the seller, probably the seller, and a closing agent. The closing agent will have a stack of papers for you and the seller to sign. While he or she will give you a basic explanation of each paper, you may want to take the time to read each one and/or consult with your agent to make sure you know exactly what you're signing. After all, this is a large amount of money you're committing to pay for a lot of years! Before you go to closing, your lender is required to give you a booklet explaining the closing costs, a "good faith estimate" of how much cash you'll have to supply at closing, and a list of documents you'll need at closing. If you don't get those items, be sure to call your lender BEFORE you go to closing. Don't hesitate to ask questions.

So what will my mortgage cover?

Most loans have 4 parts: principal: the repayment of the amount you actually borrowed; interest: payment to the lender for the money you've borrowed; homeowners insurance: a monthly amount to insure the property against loss from fire, smoke, theft, and other hazards required by most lenders; and property taxes: the annual city/county taxes assessed on your property, divided by the number of mortgage payments you make in a year. Most loans are for 30 years, although 15 year loans are available, too. During the life of the loan, you'll pay far more in interest than you will in principal - sometimes two or three times more! Because of the way loans are structured, in the first years you'll be paying mostly interest in your monthly payments. In the final years, you'll be paying mostly principal.

What are the terms?

Home Purchase Plus is a 0% interest, deferred payment loan. No payment is due as long as the applicant continues to own and live in the home as their primary residence.

A $5,000 penalty will be assessed to down-payment recipients if the property is sold within two years of obtaining the loan.

Liquid assets cannot exceed $15,000 up to time of closing.

What do I need to do to apply?

Return a completed and signed application.

Attach copies of Federal Income Tax returns (1040 's) for the past three years.

Attach copies of pay stubs for the last three months for all working household members over 18 years of age. (Minimum time on current job is 6 months and cannot be on probation.)

Attach Certification of Completion of "Pre-Home Ownership Counseling" offered through Community Action Services (801) 691-5200 located at 815 S Freedom Blvd, Provo; or NeighborWorks Provo (801) 375-5820 located at 39 W 300 N, Provo.

Attach Sellers Affidavit (form included in application or provided by Redevelopment Agency).

Attach copies of last three month's bank statements.

Original verification that all household members are US Citizens, US Nationals or permanent resident aliens, plus Social Security Cards (we will copy in our office).

What do I need to take with me when I apply for a mortgage?

 Good question! If you have everything with you when you visit your lender, you'll save a good deal of time. You should have: 1) social security numbers for both you and your spouse, if both of you are applying for the loan; 2) copies of your checking and savings account statements for the past 6 months; 3) evidence of any other assets like bonds or stocks; 4) a recent paycheck stub detailing your earnings; 5) a list of all credit card accounts and the approximate monthly amounts owed on each; 6) a list of account numbers and balances due on outstanding loans, such as car loans; 7) copies of your last 2 years' income tax statements; and 8) the name and address of someone who can verify your employment. Depending on your lender, you may be asked for other information.

What housing qualifies?

Purchase price of the home may not exceed HUD limitations ($223,000 for existing homes, $237,000 for new homes - effective 4/13/15).

Property may be a single-family home, a home with a legal accessory apartment, one half of a twin home or town home. Within the Central Business District, down-payment assistance can be obtained for condominiums only.

Home may not be currently occupied by renters who would be displaced by the purchase.

What if my offer is rejected?

They often are! But don't let that stop you. Now you begin negotiating. Your broker will help you. You may have to offer more money, but you may ask the seller to cover some or all of your closing costs or to make repairs that wouldn't normally be expected. Often, negotiations on a price go back and forth several times before a deal is made. Just remember - don't get so caught up in negotiations that you lose sight of what you really want and can afford!

What is Fair Lending?

Discrimination in mortgage lending is prohibited by the federal Fair Housing Act and HUD's Office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity actively enforces those provisions of the law. The Fair Housing Act makes it unlawful to engage in the following practices based on race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status or handicap (disability):

  • Refuse to make a mortgage loan 
  • Refuse to provide information regarding loans 
  • Impose different terms or conditions on a loan, such as different interest rates, points, or fees 
  • Discriminate in appraising property 
  • Refuse to purchase a loan or set different terms or conditions for purchasing a loan 
Filing a Complaint
If you have experienced any one of the above actions, you may be the victim of discrimination. Recognizing the signs of lending discrimination is the first step in filing a complaint. HUD investigates your complaints at no cost to you. If you believe you have experienced lending discrimination, visit our housing discrimination complaint website to learn more about the complaint process.
What is Predatory Lending?
In communities across America, people are losing their homes and their investments because of predatory lenders, appraisers, mortgage brokers and home improvement contractors who:
  • Sell properties for much more than they are worth using false appraisals. 
  • Encourage borrowers to lie about their income, expenses, or cash available for down payments in order to get a loan. 
  • Knowingly lend more money than a borrower can afford to repay. 
  • Charge high interest rates to borrowers based on their race or national origin and not on their credit history. 
  • Charge fees for unnecessary or nonexistent products and services. 
  • Pressure borrowers to accept higher-risk loans such as balloon loans, interest only payments, and steep pre-payment penalties. 
  • Target vulnerable borrowers to cash-out refinances offers when they know borrowers are in need of cash due to medical, unemployment or debt problems. 
  • "Strip" homeowners' equity from their homes by convincing them to refinance again and again when there is no benefit to the borrower. 
  • Use high pressure sales tactics to sell home improvements and then finance them at high interest rates.

What is the Home Purchase Plus Program?

A 0% deferred payment loan to assist low-income families/individuals in becoming home owners in Provo.

INCOME CHART

Persons in Household  Maximum Household Income 
1 $35,950
$41,100
$46,250
$51,350
$55,500
$59,600
$63,700
$67,800

Must be first-time home buyer (click here for definition of first-time home buyer).

Must qualify for a first mortgage through a lender of the buyer’s choice.  It is a requirement that spouses or partners be included on our loan and on title whether or not their income is necessary to qualify for this loan.

Single individuals may qualify for loans on a maximum two-bedroom house.


 

What Tactics Do Predators Use?

A lender or investor tells you that they are your only chance of getting a loan or owning a home. You should be able to take your time to shop around and compare prices and houses. 

  • The house you are buying costs a lot more than other homes in the neighborhood, but isn't any
    bigger or better. 
  • You are asked to sign a sales contract or loan documents that are blank or that contain information which
    is not true. 
  • You are told that the Federal Housing Administration insurance protects you against property defects or loan fraud - it does not. 
  • The cost or loan terms at closing are not what you agreed to. 
  • You are told that refinancing can solve your credit or money problems. 
  • You are told that you can only get a good deal on a home improvement if you finance it with a
    particular lender. 

Remember: 
If a deal to buy, repair or refinance a house sounds too good to be true, it usually is.